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See also: "Film festivals in Europe
"Big Three"[8][9]
Others

Film awards[edit]

Directors[edit]

Actors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cinema Europe: The Other Hollywood". Rovi. The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-07-18. 
  2. ^ December 28, 1895.
  3. ^ Georges Sadoul, Histoire du cinéma mondial, des origines à nos jours, Flammarion, Paris, 1968, p. 19
  4. ^ Institut Lumière.
  5. ^ "Cahiers du cinéma, n°hors-série, Paris, April 2000, p. 32 (cf. also Histoire des communications, 2011, p. 10.).
  6. ^ Cf. Binant, " Au cœur de la projection numérique ", Actions, 29, Kodak, Paris, 2007, p. 12. Archived May 22, 2014, at the "Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Claude Forest, « De la pellicule aux pixels : l'anomie des exploitants de salles de cinéma », in Laurent Creton, Kira Kitsopanidou (sous la direction de), Les salles de cinéma : enjeux, défis et perspectives, Armand Colin / Recherche, Paris, 2013, p. 116.
  8. ^ "Bordwell, David (2005). Figures Traced in Light: On Cinematic Staging. "University of California Press. p. 144. "ISBN "9780520241978. Because reputations were made principally on the festival circuit, the filmmaker had to find international financing and distribution and settle for minor festivals before arriving at one of the Big Three (Berlin, Cannes, Venice). 
  9. ^ Wong, Cindy Hing-Yuk (2011). Film Festivals: Culture, People, and Power on the Global Screen. "Rutgers University Press. p. 5. "ISBN "9780813551104. Whether we talk about the Big Three festivals—Cannes, Venice, Berlin—look at Sundance, Tribeca, and Toronto in North America, or examine other significant world festivals in Hong Kong, Pusan, Locarno, Rotterdam, San Sebastián, and Mar del Plata, the insistent global icons of all festivals are films, discoveries, auteurs, stars, parties, and awards. 

External links[edit]


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