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Main article: "Lists of network protocols

"Protocol stacks or families include multiple interacting protocols:

The Internet Protocol is used in concert with other protocols within the Internet protocol suite, notable components of which include:

Other instances of high level "interaction protocols are:

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Licesio J. Rodríguez-Aragón: Tema 4: Internet y Teleinformática. retrieved 2013-04-24. (Spanish)
  2. ^ Protocol, "Encyclopædia Britannica, retrieved 2012-09-24 
  3. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The Need For Multiple Protocols, p. 177, "They (protocols) are to communication what programming languages are to computation"
  4. ^ Ben-Ari 1982, chapter 2 - The concurrent programming abstraction, p. 18-19, states the same.
  5. ^ Ben-Ari 1982, Section 2.7 - Summary, p. 27, summarizes the concurrent programming abstraction.
  6. ^ a b Marsden 1986, Section 6.1 - Why are standards necessary?, p. 64-65, uses BSC as an example to show the need for both standard protocols and a standard framework.
  7. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The Need For Multiple Protocols, p. 177, explains this by drawing analogies between computer communication and programming languages.
  8. ^ a b Sect. 11.10 - The Disadvantage Of Layering, p. 192, states: layering forms the basis for protocol design.
  9. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The Need For Multiple Protocols, p. 177, states the same.
  10. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.3 - The Conceptual Layers Of Protocol Software, p. 178, "Each layer takes responsibility for handling one part of the problem."
  11. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.11 - The Basic Idea Behind Multiplexing And Demultiplexing, p. 192, states the same.
  12. ^ Marsden 1986, Chapter 3 - Fundamental protocol concepts and problem areas, p. 26-42, explains much of the following.
  13. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 7.7.4 - Datagram Size, Network MTU, and Fragmentation, p. 104, Explains fragmentation and the effect on the header of the fragments.
  14. ^ Comer 2000, Chapter 4 - Classful Internet Addresses, p. 64-67;71.
  15. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.3 - Layering concepts and general definitions, p. 187, explains address mapping.
  16. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.2 - Detection and transmission errors, p. 27, explains the advantages of backward error correction.
  17. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.3 - Acknowledgement, p. 28-33, explains the advantages of positive only acknowledgement and mentions datagram protocols as exceptions.
  18. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.4 - Loss of information - timeouts and retries, p. 33-34.
  19. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.5 - Direction of information flow, p. 34-35, explains master/slave and the negotiations to gain control.
  20. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.6 - Sequence control, p. 35-36, explains how packets get lost and how sequencing solves this.
  21. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 3.7 - Flow control, p. 36-38.
  22. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 1.3 - Internet Services, p. 3, "Protocols are to communication what algorithms are to computation"
  23. ^ Tennent 1981, Section 2.3.1 - Definitions, p.15, defines scope and binding.
  24. ^ Tennent 1981, Section 2.3.2 Environments and stores, p.16, the semantics of blocks and definitions are described using environments and stores.
  25. ^ Hoare (1985), Ch. 4 - Communication, p. 133, In the introduction: a communication is an event described by a pair c.v where c is the name of the communication channel and v is the value of the message.
  26. ^ Tanenbaum, Andrew S. (2003). Computer networks. Prentice Hall Professional. p. 235. "ISBN "978-0-13-066102-9. Retrieved 22 June 2011. 
  27. ^ Comer 2000, Foreword To The First Edition By The Late Jon Postel, xxv, "The principles of architecture, layering, multiplexing, encapsulation, addressing and address mapping, routing, and naming are quite similar in any protocol suite, though of course, different in detail.".
  28. ^ Ben-Ari 1982, in his preface, p. xiii.
  29. ^ Ben-Ari 1982, in his preface, p. xiv.
  30. ^ Hoare 1985, Chapter 4 - Communication, p. 133, deals with communication.
  31. ^ S. Srinivasan, NPTEL courses:::: Electronics & Communication Engineering :: Digital Circuits and Systems, available online: http://nptel.iitm.ac.in/video.php?courseId=1005&p=3
  32. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The Need For Multiple Protocols, p. 177, states more or less the same, using other analogies.
  33. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.7 - The Protocol Layering Principle, p. 187, explains layered protocols.
  34. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The Need For Multiple Protocols, p. 177, introduces the decomposition in layers.
  35. ^ a b Comer 2000, Sect. 11.2 - The need for multiple protocols, p. 178, explains similarities protocol software and compiler, assembler, linker, loader.
  36. ^ Comer 2000, Glossary of Internetworking terms, p.686: term encapsulation.
  37. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.5.1 - The TCP/IP 5-Layer Reference Model, p. 184, Describes the transformations of messages or streams that can be observed in the protocol layers.
  38. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 2.4.10 - Ethernet Frame Format, p. 30, Ethernet frames are used as an example for administrative data for the protocol itself.
  39. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.4 - Functionality Of The Layers, p. 181, states the same about the software organization.
  40. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 3.3 - Network-Level Interconnection, p. 55, explains universal interconnection and internetworking.
  41. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 4.4 - Addresses Specify Network Connections, p. 86, explains this.
  42. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 4.3 - The Original Classful Addressing Scheme, p. 64, explains the address scheme, netid and routing.
  43. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 5.13 - Summary, p. 86, explains ARP.
  44. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 2.11 - Other Technologies Over Which TCP/IP Has Been Used, p. 46, states the same.
  45. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 8.3.2 - Indirect Delivery, p. 118, states the same.
  46. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 8.5 - Next-Hop Routing, p. 120, gives details on the routing table.
  47. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 8.6 - Default Routes, p. 121, explains default routing and its use.
  48. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 3.8 - All Networks Are Equal, p. 59, states the same.
  49. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 7.5 - Connectionless Delivery System, p. 97, explains the delivery system.
  50. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 7.6 - Purposes Of The Internet Protocol, p. 97, states the same.
  51. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 2.11.1 - X25NET And Tunnels, p. 46-47, explains tunneling X.25 and mentions ATM.
  52. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 13.1 - Introduction, p. 209, introduces TCP.
  53. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 12.10 - Summary, p. 206, explains UDP.
  54. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.3 - The Conceptual Layers Of Protocol Software, p. 179, the first two paragraphs describe the sending of a message through successive layers.
  55. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 9.3 - Error Reporting vs. Error Correction, p. 131, describes the ICMP protocol that is used to handle datagram errors.
  56. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 7.7.5 - Reassembly Of Fragments, p. 104, describes reassembly of datagrams.
  57. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.5.1 - The TCP/IP 5-Layer Reference Model, p. 184, explains functionality of the layers.
  58. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.9.1 - High-Level Protocol Boundary, p. 191, describes the boundary.
  59. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.9.1 - Operating System Boundary, p. 192, describes the operating system boundary.
  60. ^ IETF 1989, Sect 1.3.1 - Organization, p. 15, 2nd paragraph: many design choices involve creative "breaking" of strict layering.
  61. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.10 - The Disadvantage Of Layering, p. 192, explains why "strict layering can be extremely inefficient" giving examples of optimizations.
  62. ^ IETF 1989, Sect 1.3.1 - Organization, p. 15, 2nd paragraph, explaining why "strict layering is an imperfect model"
  63. ^ IETF 1989, Sect 1.3.1 - Organization, p. 15, states: This layerist organization was chosen for simplicity and clarity.
  64. ^ Jorge Edison Lascano, Stephen Clyde, and Ali Raza. “Communication-protocol Design Patterns (CommDP) - COMMDP.” [Online]. Available: http://commdp.serv.usu.edu/wiki/index.php/Communication-protocol_Design_Patterns_(CommDP). [Accessed: 17-Mar-2017].
  65. ^ J. E. Lascano and S. Clyde, “A Pattern Language for Application-level Communication Protocols,” presented at the ICSEA 2016, The Eleventh International Conference on Software Engineering Advances, 2016, pp. 22–30.
  66. ^ R. Daigneau, Service Design Patterns: Fundamental Design Solutions for SOAP/WSDL and RESTful Web Services, 1 edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Addison-Wesley Professional, 2011.
  67. ^ M. Fowler, Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture, 1 edition. Boston: Addison-Wesley Professional, 2002.
  68. ^ [1]F. Buschmann, K. Henney, and D. C. Schmidt, Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture Volume 4: A Pattern Language for Distributed Computing, Volume 4 edition. Chichester England; New York: Wiley, 2007.
  69. ^ Bochmann, G. (1978). "Finite state description of communication protocols". Computer Networks (1976). 2 (4–5): 361–201. "doi:10.1016/0376-5075(78)90015-6. 
  70. ^ Comer 2000, Glossary of Internetworking Terms and Abbreviations, p. 704, term protocol.
  71. ^ Brand, Daniel; Zafiropulo, Pitro (1983). "On Communicating Finite-State Machines". Journal of the ACM. 30 (2): 323. "doi:10.1145/322374.322380. 
  72. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 6.3 - Advantages of standardisation, p. 66-67, states the same.
  73. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 6.4 - Some problems with standardisation, p. 67, follows HDLC to illustrate the process.
  74. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 6.1 - Why are standards necessary?, p. 65, explains lessons learned from ARPANET.
  75. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.1 - Introduction, p. 181, introduces OSI.
  76. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.3 - Layering concepts and general definitions, p. 183-185, explains terminology.
  77. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.4 - The application layer, p. 188, explains this.
  78. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.5 - The presentation layer, p. 189, explains this.
  79. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.6 - The session layer, p. 190, explains this.
  80. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.7 - The transport layer, p. 191, explains this.
  81. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.8 - The network layer, p. 192, explains this.
  82. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.9 - The data link layer, p. 194, explains this.
  83. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.10 - The physical layer, p. 195, explains this.
  84. ^ Marsden 1986, Section 14.11 - Connectionless mode and RM/OSI, p. 195, mentions this.
  85. ^ Comer 2000, Section 1.9 - Internet Protocols And Standardization, p. 12, explains why the IETF did not use existing protocols.
  86. ^ Comer 2000, Sect. 11.5.1 - The TCP/IP 5-Layer Reference Model, p. 183, states the same.

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