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The U.S. state of "Oregon is the third largest renewable energy producing state in the "United States.[1] Hydroelectric power dominates the power market in Oregon, providing nearly two-thirds of the electricity generated in the state, although it accounts for less than half of the total percentage consumed when electricity imported from other states is accounted for.[2] Coal is the second largest source of the state's energy portfolio, with much of it being imported from "Wyoming and domestic production coming from the "Boardman Coal Plant, Oregon's only coal power plant.[3]

Contents

Electricity[edit]

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Sources of Oregon Electricity Generation[4]

The following table uses official statistics from the "Oregon Department of Energy to show Oregon's changing electric fuel mix:[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12]

Year 2001 2002 2003 2005 2006-08 2009-11 2010-12 2012-14
Hydro (%) 38 43 44 42 44 43 45 43
Coal (%) 39 42 42 41 37 34 33 34
Natural Gas (%) 15 8 7 10 12 12 12 14
Nuclear (%) 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 3
Wind/Geothermal (%) 1 1 1 1 2 5 5 6
Biomass (%) 3 3 3 3 1 3 1 0.3
Total (%) 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100


Renewable Energy[edit]

The Oregon Renewable Energy Act was signed into law in 2007. It mandated that at least 20% of all energy resources comes from renewable resources by 2020, and it raises the standard to 25% by 2025.[13][14] Former Union County Commissioner and renewable energy advocate "John Lamoreau encouraged the legislature to pass the bill.

On March 8, 2016 Gov. Kate Brown signed the Clean Energy and Coal Transition Act into law.[15] This new law mandates increases in renewable energy resources to 27% by 2025, 35% by 2030, 45% by 2035, and 50% by 2040.[13] Under terms of the legislation, by 2035 Oregonians will no longer pay for any energy from coal by 2035.[16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Staff (2010). "Oregon". "United States Department of Energy. Archived from the original on 2010-04-22. Retrieved 2010-02-15. 
  2. ^ "Energy Information Administration (2010-04-29). "State Energy Profiles - Oregon". "United States Department of Energy. Retrieved 2010-05-02. 
  3. ^ Baer, April (2009-04-13). "Even In Hydro-Rich Northwest, Coal Still Major Power Source". "Oregon Public Broadcasting. Retrieved 2010-02-15. 
  4. ^ U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly, February 2017
  5. ^ Oregon Office of Energy (December 2002). "State of Oregon Energy Plan 2003-2005" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2010-05-02. 
  6. ^ Oregon Office of Energy (December 2004). "Oregon Strategy for Greenhouse Gas Reductions" (PDF). "State of Oregon. p. B-5. Retrieved 2012-08-24. 
  7. ^ Oregon Office of Energy (January 2005). "State of Oregon Energy Plan 2005-2007" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2010-05-02. 
  8. ^ Oregon Office of Energy (March 2008). "State of Oregon Energy Plan 2007-2009" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2010-02-15. 
  9. ^ "State of Oregon Energy Plan 2011-2013" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. February 2011. Retrieved 2012-08-22. 
  10. ^ "2013-2015 Biennial Energy Plan" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2017-08-03. 
  11. ^ "2015-2017 Biennial Energy Plan" (PDF). "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2017-08-03. 
  12. ^ "Electricity Mix in Oregon". "Oregon Department of Energy. Retrieved 2017-08-03. 
  13. ^ a b "Oregon Legislature sets new renewable energy standards". Portland General Electric. March 2, 2016. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Oregon House Passes Renewable Energy Standard With Broad, Bipartisan Support". Cleanergy. May 23, 2007. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  15. ^ Theriault, Dennis (March 10, 2016). "Kate Brown has signed Oregon's historic, contentious anti-coal bill". The Oregonian/Oregon Live. Portland, Oregon. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 
  16. ^ "Oregon Passes Historic Bill to Phase Out Coal and Double Down on Renewables". EcoWatch. March 3, 2016. Retrieved December 27, 2016. 

External links[edit]

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