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""Granville Wellington Carter, Sculptor.jpg
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Granville Wellington Carter "NA, "Fellow National Sculpture Society (November 18, 1920 – November 21, 1992) was an American sculptor.[1]

He started his sculpture career by taking up wood carving as a teenager. Many of his wood carved creations would be signed "Dany", as he was known by family and friends. His fine wood carvings gained him praise and coverage in local newspapers such as the ""Portland Sunday Telegram".,[2] and the ""Lewistion Journal".[3] Carter was featured the 1949 book "Handicrafts of New England," by Allen Eaton.[4]

Dany Carter was a prolific whittler of figures and animals. All were executed in his wood of choice - "white pine. He also crafted several dioramas, some were scenes from "Disney's ""Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937 film)," and ""Pinocchio." Other dioramas included practical lighting effects incorporated into the settings giving them their own dramatic lighting effects.

One of his largest carvings titled "Under the Wire," can be viewed at the ""Harness Racing Museum & Hall of Fame", "Goshen, New York. The diorama was donated in 1972 by noted businessman and philanthropist, Louis Resnick. The 4 ft wood harness racing diorama depicts a harrowing scene where a driver is thrown from his sulky, as three trailing sulkies are bearing down on the displaced driver.

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"UNDER THE WIRE". Woodcarving signed "Dany" aka: Granville Carter

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Biography[edit]

He was born on November 18, 1920 in "Augusta, Maine.

His formal art training began in 1944 under "Alexander Bower at the "Portland School for Fine and Applied Art. This was followed by four more years of studying under "John Flanagan (sculptor) in "New York City.

He married Senta Jacobshagen, a painter and commercial artist who produced "illuminated manuscripts. They had a daughter Juliana Carter, and a son, Richard Carter.

In 1954 he received two Tiffany Fellowships which allowed to further his studies in "Paris and "Rome.[5] There he attended the "Academie de la Grande Chaumiere and the "Scuolo del Circolare Internazionale di Roma" and was in residence for one year (1954–1955) at the "American Academy in Rome.

He died of "lung cancer in "Baldwin, Nassau County, New York on November 21, 1992 at the age of 72.[1] He was interred at the "George Washington Memorial Park in "Paramus, New Jersey.

Art training[edit]

Carter worked as an assistant for "Herbert Haseltine and over a ten-year span assisted him on three "equestrian statues, "Man o' War in "Lexington, Kentucky, Sir "John Dill on "Arlington National Cemetery and "George Washington at the "National Cathedral. For short periods of time he also assisted the distinguished sculptors "Bryant Baker, "Joseph Kiselewski and "Sidney Waugh.

Professional memberships[edit]

Academician, "National Academy of Design 1960; Fellow, National Sculpture Society; Fellow, "American Artists Professional League; Life Fellow, "American Numismatic Society; member, Council of American Artist Societies, National Register of Prominent Americans and International Notables.

Carter was a member of the "National Sculpture Society since 1956, and eventually elected a Fellow, held numerous positions at the Sculpture Society, including:

Awards[edit]


G.W. Carter was an Instructor at the "National *Academy School of Fine Arts in NYC from 1967 through the 1980s.

Medals[edit]

Plaques[edit]

Statuary[edit]

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Garden City Station - Stewart Statue
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West Texas Pioneer Family, Lubbock Texas. Dedicated: June, 1971
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General Casimir Pulaski Monument, Hartford, Connecticut. Dedicated: July 4, 1976

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Granville W. Carter; Sculptor, 72". "New York Times. November 25, 1992. Retrieved 2012-11-24. Granville W. Carter, a sculptor and former president of the National Sculpture Society, died on Saturday at Mercy Hospital in Rockville Centre, L.I. He was 72 years old and lived in Baldwin, L.I. He died of lung cancer, his family said. ... 
  2. ^ Henderson, Ruth., The Right Knife Went Into The Right Chimney, Portland Sunday Telegram, July 12, 1941
  3. ^ Conner, Sam E., Augusta Man Turns Out Excellent Wood Carvings, Lewiston Journal, June 10, 1941
  4. ^ Eaton, Allen H., Handicrafts of New England, Harper & Brothers Publishers, NY, 1949
  5. ^ Salmon, Robin R. Brookgreen Garden Sculpture: Volume II, Brookgreen Gardens, 1993 p. 204
  6. ^ Opitz, Glenn B., Mantle Fielding's Dictionary of American Painters, Sculptors & Engravers, Apollo Books, Poughkeepsie, NY, 1988

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

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