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The early history of radio is the "history of technology that produce and use "radio instruments that use "radio waves. Within the "timeline of radio, many people contributed theory and inventions in what became "radio.[1] Radio development began as ""wireless telegraphy".[1] Later radio history increasingly involves matters of "broadcasting.

Contents

Summary[edit]

Invention[edit]

The idea of wireless communication predates the discovery of "radio" with experiments in ""wireless telegraphy" via inductive and capacitive induction and transmission through the ground, water, and even "train tracks from the 1830s on. "James Clerk Maxwell showed in theoretical and mathematical form in 1864 that electromagnetic waves could propagate through free space.[2][3] It is likely that the first intentional transmission of a signal by means of electromagnetic waves was performed in an experiment by "David Edward Hughes around 1880, although this was considered to be induction at the time. In 1888 "Heinrich Rudolf Hertz was able to conclusively prove transmitted airborne electromagnetic waves in an experiment confirming Maxwell's theory of "electromagnetism.

After the discovery of these "Hertzian waves" (it would take almost 20 years for the term "radio" to be universally adopted for this type of electromagnetic radiation)[4] many scientists and inventors experimented with wireless transmission, some trying to develop a system of communication, some intentionally using these new Hertzian waves, some not. Maxwell's theory showing that light and Hertzian electromagnetic waves were the same phenomenon at different wavelengths led "Maxwellian" scientist such as John Perry, "Frederick Thomas Trouton and Alexander Trotter to assume they would be analogous to optical signaling[5][6] and the Serbian American engineer "Nikola Tesla to consider them relatively useless for communication since "light" could not transmit further than "line of sight.[7] In 1892 the physicist "William Crookes wrote on the possibilities of wireless telegraphy based on Hertzian waves[8] and in 1893 Tesla proposed a system for transmitting intelligence and wireless power using the earth as the medium.[9] Others, such as "Amos Dolbear, "Sir Oliver Lodge, "Reginald Fessenden,[10] and "Alexander Popov[11] were involved in the development of components and theory involved with the transmission and reception of airborne electromagnetic waves for their own theoretical work or as a potential means of communication.

Over several years starting in 1894 the Italian inventor "Guglielmo Marconi built the first complete, commercially successful "wireless telegraphy system based on airborne Hertzian waves ("radio transmission).[12] Marconi demonstrated application of radio in military and marine communications and started a company for the development and propagation of radio communication services and equipment.

19th century[edit]

The meaning and usage of the word "radio" has developed in parallel with developments within the field of communications and can be seen to have three distinct phases: electromagnetic waves and experimentation; wireless communication and technical development; and radio broadcasting and commercialization. In an 1864 presentation, published in 1865, "James Clerk Maxwell proposed his theories and mathematical proofs on "electromagnetism that showed that light and other phenomena were all types of electromagnetic waves propagating through "free space.[2][3][13][14][15] In 1886–88 "Heinrich Rudolf Hertz conducted a series of experiments that proved the existence of Maxwell's electromagnetic waves, using a frequency in what would later be called the "radio spectrum. Many individuals—inventors, engineers, developers and businessmen—constructed systems based on their own understanding of these and other phenomena, some predating Maxwell and Hertz's discoveries. Thus "wireless telegraphy" and radio wave-based systems can be attributed to multiple "inventors". Development from a laboratory demonstration to a commercial entity spanned several decades and required the efforts of many practitioners.

In 1878, "David E. Hughes noticed that sparks could be heard in a telephone receiver when experimenting with his carbon microphone. He developed this carbon-based detector further and eventually could detect signals over a few hundred yards. He demonstrated his discovery to the "Royal Society in 1880, but was told it was merely induction, and therefore abandoned further research. "Thomas Edison came across the electromagnetic phenomenon while experimenting with a telegraph at "Menlo Park. He noted an unexplained transmission effect while experimenting with a "telegraph. He referred to this as "etheric force in an announcement on November 28, 1875. "Elihu Thomson published his findings on Edison's new "force", again attributing it to induction, an explanation that Edison accepted. Edison would go on the next year to take out U.S. Patent 465,971 on a system of electrical wireless communication between ships based on "electrostatic coupling using the water and elevated terminals. Although this was not a radio system the "Marconi Company would purchase the rights in 1903 to protect them["clarification needed] legally from lawsuits.[16]

Hertzian waves[edit]

Between 1886 and 1888 "Heinrich Rudolf Hertz published the results of his experiments where he was able to transmit electromagnetic waves (radio waves) through the air, proving Maxwell's electromagnetic theory.[17][18] Early on after their discovery, radio waves were referred to as "Hertzian waves".[19] Between 1890 and 1892 physicists such as John Perry, "Frederick Thomas Trouton and "William Crookes proposed electromagnetic or Hertzian waves as a navigation aid or means of communication, with Crookes writing on the possibilities of wireless telegraphy based on Hertzian waves in 1892.[8]

After learning of Hertz demonstrations of wireless transmission, inventor "Nikola Tesla began developing his own system based on Hertz and Maxwell's ideas, primarily as a means of wireless lighting and power distribution.[20][21] Tesla, concluding that Hertz had not demonstrated airborne electromagnetic waves (radio transmission), went on to develop a system based on what he thought was the primary conductor, the earth.[22] In 1893 demonstrations of his ideas, in "St. Louis, Missouri and at the "Franklin Institute in "Philadelphia, Tesla proposed this wireless power technology could also incorporate a system for the "telecommunication of "information.

In a lecture on the work of Hertz, shortly after his death, Professor "Oliver Lodge and "Alexander Muirhead demonstrated wireless signaling using Hertzian (radio) waves in the lecture theater of the "Oxford University Museum of Natural History on August 14, 1894. During the demonstration a radio signal was sent from the neighboring "Clarendon Laboratory building, and received by apparatus in the lecture theater.

Building on the work of Lodge,[23] the Indian Bengali physicist "Jagadish Chandra Bose ignited gunpowder and rang a bell at a distance using millimeter range wavelength microwaves in a November 1894 public demonstration at the Town Hall of "Kolkata. Bose wrote in a "Bengali essay, Adrisya Alok (Invisible Light), "The invisible light can easily pass through brick walls, buildings etc. Therefore, messages can be transmitted by means of it without the mediation of wires." Bose’s first scientific paper, "On polarisation of electric rays by double-refracting crystals" was communicated to the Asiatic Society of Bengal in May 1895. His second paper was communicated to the Royal Society of London by Lord Rayleigh in October 1895. In December 1895, the London journal The Electrician (Vol. 36) published Bose’s paper, "On a new electro-polariscope". At that time, the word '"coherer', coined by Lodge, was used in the "English-speaking world for Hertzian wave receivers or detectors. The Electrician readily commented on Bose’s coherer. (December 1895). The Englishman (18 January 1896) quoted from the Electrician and commented as follows: "Should Professor Bose succeed in perfecting and patenting his ‘Coherer’, we may in time see the whole system of coast lighting throughout the navigable world revolutionised by an Indian Bengali scientist working single handed in our Presidency College Laboratory." Bose planned to "perfect his coherer", but never thought of patenting it.

In 1895, conducting experiments along the lines of Hertz's research, "Alexander Stepanovich Popov built his first radio receiver, which contained a coherer. Further refined as a "lightning detector, it was presented to the Russian Physical and Chemical Society on May 7, 1895. A depiction of Popov's lightning detector was printed in the Journal of the Russian Physical and Chemical Society the same year (publication of the minutes 15/201 of this session — December issue of the journal RPCS[24]). An earlier description of the device was given by "Dmitry Aleksandrovich Lachinov in July 1895 in the 2nd edition of his course "Fundamentals of Meteorology and climatology" — the first in Russia.[25][26] Popov's receiver was created on the improved basis of Lodge's receiver, and originally intended for reproduction of its experiments.

Marconi[edit]

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British Post Office engineers inspect Guglielmo Marconi's wireless telegraphy (radio) equipment in 1897.

In 1894 the young Italian inventor "Guglielmo Marconi began working on the idea of building a commercial wireless telegraphy system based on the use of Hertzian waves (radio waves), a line of inquiry that he noted other inventors did not seem to be pursuing.[27] Marconi read through the literature and used the ideas of others who were experimenting with radio waves but did a great deal to develop devices such as portable transmitters and receiver systems that could work over long distances,[12] turning what was essentially a laboratory experiment into a useful communication system.[28] By August 1895 Marconi was field testing his system but even with improvements he was only able to transmit signals up to one-half mile, a distance Oliver Lodge had predicted in 1894 as the maximum transmission distance for radio waves. Marconi raised the height of his antenna and hit upon the idea of grounding his transmitter and receiver. With these improvements the system was capable of transmitting signals up to 2 miles (3.2 km) and over hills.[29] Marconi's experimental apparatus proved to be the first engineering-complete, commercially successful "radio transmission system.[30][31][32] Marconi’s apparatus is also credited with saving the 700 people who survived the tragic "Titanic disaster.[33]

In 1896, Marconi was awarded British patent 12039, Improvements in transmitting electrical impulses and signals and in apparatus there-for, the first patent ever issued for a Hertzian wave (radio wave) base wireless telegraphic system.[34] In 1897, he established a radio station on the "Isle of Wight, England. Marconi opened his "wireless" factory in the former "silk-works at Hall Street, "Chelmsford, England in 1898, employing around 60 people. Shortly after the 1900s, Marconi held the patent rights for radio. Marconi would go on to win the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1909[35] and be more successful than any other inventor in his ability to commercialize radio and its associated equipment into a global business.[12] In the US some of his subsequent patented refinements (but not his original radio patent) would be overturned in a 1935 court case (upheld by the US Supreme Court in 1943).[36]

20th century[edit]

In 1900, Brazilian priest Roberto "Landell de Moura transmitted the human voice wirelessly. According to the newspaper Jornal do Comercio (June 10, 1900), he conducted his first public experiment on June 3, 1900, in front of journalists and the General Consul of Great Britain, C.P. Lupton, in "São Paulo, Brazil, for a distance of approximately 5.0 miles (8 km). The points of transmission and reception were Alto de Santana and Paulista Avenue.[37]

One year after that experiment, he received his first patent from the Brazilian government. It was described as "equipment for the purpose of phonetic transmissions through space, land and water elements at a distance with or without the use of wires." Four months later, knowing that his "invention had real value, he left Brazil for the United States with the intent of patenting the machine at the "US Patent Office in "Washington, DC.

Having few resources, he had to rely on friends to push his project. Despite great difficulty, three patents were awarded: "The Wave Transmitter" (October 11, 1904), which is the precursor of today's radio transceiver; "The Wireless Telephone" and the "Wireless Telegraph", both dated November 22, 1904.

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"The Wireless Telephone" U S Patent Office in Washington, DC

The next advancement was the vacuum tube detector, invented by "Westinghouse engineers. On "Christmas Eve 1906, "Reginald Fessenden used a synchronous "rotary-spark transmitter for the first radio program broadcast, from "Ocean Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts. Ships at sea heard a broadcast that included Fessenden playing "O Holy Night on the "violin and reading a passage from the "Bible.[38] This was, for all intents and purposes, the first transmission of what is now known as amplitude modulation or AM radio.

In June 1912 Marconi opened the world's first purpose-built radio factory at "New Street Works in Chelmsford, England.

The first radio news program was broadcast August 31, 1920 by station 8MK in "Detroit, "Michigan, which survives today as all-news format station "WWJ under ownership of the CBS network. The first college radio station began broadcasting on October 14, 1920 from Union College, Schenectady, "New York under the personal call letters of Wendell King, an "African-American student at the school.[38]

That month 2ADD (renamed "WRUC in 1947), aired what is believed to be the first public entertainment broadcast in the United States, a series of Thursday night concerts initially heard within a 100-mile (160 km) radius and later for a 1,000-mile (1,600 km) radius. In November 1920, it aired the first broadcast of a sporting event.[38][39] At 9 pm on August 27, 1920, Sociedad Radio Argentina aired a live performance of Richard Wagner's opera Parsifal from the Coliseo Theater in downtown "Buenos Aires. Only about twenty homes in the city had receivers to tune in this radio program. Meanwhile, regular entertainment broadcasts commenced in 1922 from the Marconi Research Centre at "Writtle, England.

Sports broadcasting began at this time as well, including the "college football on radio broadcast of a "1921 West Virginia vs. Pittsburgh football game.[40]

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An American girl listens to a radio during the "Great Depression

One of the first developments in the early 20th century was that aircraft used commercial AM radio stations for navigation. This continued until the early 1960s when "VOR systems became widespread.[41] In the early 1930s, "single sideband and frequency modulation were invented by amateur radio operators. By the end of the decade, they were established commercial modes. Radio was used to transmit pictures visible as "television as early as the 1920s. Commercial television transmissions started in North America and Europe in the 1940s.

In 1947 AT&T commercialized the "Mobile Telephone Service. From its start in St. Louis in 1946, AT&T then introduced Mobile Telephone Service to one hundred towns and highway corridors by 1948. Mobile Telephone Service was a rarity with only 5,000 customers placing about 30,000 calls each week. Because only three radio channels were available, only three customers in any given city could make mobile telephone calls at one time.[42] Mobile Telephone Service was expensive, costing 15 USD per month, plus 0.30 to 0.40 USD per local call, equivalent to about 176 USD per month and 3.50 to 4.75 per call in 2012 USD.[43] The "Advanced Mobile Phone System "analog mobile "cell phone system, developed by "Bell Labs, was introduced in the Americas in 1978,[44][45][46] gave much more capacity. It was the primary analog mobile phone system in North America (and other locales) through the 1980s and into the 2000s.

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The "Regency TR-1, which used "Texas Instruments' "NPN transistors, was the world's first commercially produced "transistor radio.

In 1954, the Regency company introduced a pocket "transistor radio, the "TR-1, powered by a "standard 22.5 V Battery." In 1955, the newly formed "Sony company introduced its first transistorized radio.[47] It was small enough to fit in a "vest pocket, powered by a small battery. It was durable, because it had no vacuum tubes to burn out. Over the next 20 years, transistors replaced tubes almost completely except for high-power "transmitters.

By 1963, color television was being broadcast commercially (though not all broadcasts or programs were in color), and the first (radio) "communication satellite, "Telstar, was launched. In the late 1960s, the U.S. long-distance telephone network began to convert to a digital network, employing "digital radios for many of its links. In the 1970s, "LORAN became the premier "radio navigation system.

Soon, the U.S. Navy experimented with "satellite navigation, culminating in the launch of the "Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation in 1987. In the early 1990s, amateur radio experimenters began to use personal computers with audio cards to process radio signals. In 1994, the U.S. Army and "DARPA launched an aggressive, successful project to construct a "software-defined radio that can be programmed to be virtually any radio by changing its software program. Digital transmissions began to be applied to broadcasting in the late 1990s.

Start of the 20th century[edit]

Around the start of the 20th century, the Slaby-Arco wireless system was developed by "Adolf Slaby and "Georg von Arco. In 1900, "Reginald Fessenden made a weak transmission of voice over the airwaves. In 1901, Marconi conducted the first successful transatlantic experimental radio communications. In 1904, The "U.S. Patent Office reversed its decision, awarding Marconi a patent for the invention of radio, possibly influenced by Marconi's financial backers in the States, who included "Thomas Edison and "Andrew Carnegie. This also allowed the U.S. government (among others) to avoid having to pay the royalties that were being claimed by Tesla for use of his patents. For more information see "Marconi's radio work. In 1907, Marconi established the first commercial transatlantic radio communications service, between "Clifden, Ireland and "Glace Bay, "Newfoundland.

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Donald Manson working as an employee of the Marconi Company (England, 1906)

Julio Cervera Baviera[edit]

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Julio Cervera Baviera

"Julio Cervera Baviera developed radio in Spain around 1902.[48][49] Cervera Baviera obtained patents in England, Germany, Belgium, and Spain. In May–June 1899, Cervera had, with the blessing of the "Spanish Army, visited Marconi's radiotelegraphic installations on the "English Channel, and worked to develop his own system. He began collaborating with Marconi on resolving the problem of a wireless communication system, obtaining some "patents by the end of 1899. Cervera, who had worked with Marconi and his assistant George Kemp in 1899, resolved the difficulties of wireless telegraph and obtained his first patents prior to the end of that year. On March 22, 1902, Cervera founded the Spanish Wireless Telegraph and Telephone Corporation and brought to his corporation the patents he had obtained in Spain, Belgium, Germany and England.[50] He established the second and third regular radiotelegraph service in the history of the world in 1901 and 1902 by maintaining regular transmissions between "Tarifa and "Ceuta (across the "Straits of Gibraltar) for three consecutive months, and between "Javea ("Cabo de la Nao) and "Ibiza (Cabo Pelado). This is after Marconi established the radiotelegraphic service between the "Isle of Wight and "Bournemouth in 1898. In 1906, Domenico Mazzotto wrote: "In Spain the "Minister of War has applied the system perfected by the commander of military engineering, Julio Cervera Baviera (English patent No. 20084 (1899))."[51] Cervera thus achieved some success in this field, but his radiotelegraphic activities ceased suddenly, the reasons for which are unclear to this day.[52]

British Marconi[edit]

Using various "patents, the "British Marconi company was established in 1897 and began communication between "coast radio stations and ships at sea. This company, along with its subsidiaries "Canadian Marconi and "American Marconi, had a stranglehold on ship-to-shore communication. It operated much the way "American Telephone and Telegraph operated until 1983, owning all of its equipment and refusing to communicate with non-Marconi equipped ships. In June 1912, after the "RMS Titanic disaster, due to increased production Marconi opened the world's first purpose-built radio factory at "New Street Works in "Chelmsford, and in 1932 the "Marconi Research Laboratory. Many inventions improved the quality of radio, and amateurs experimented with uses of radio, thus planting the first seeds of broadcasting.

Telefunken[edit]

The company "Telefunken was founded on May 27, 1903, as "Telefunken society for wireless telefon" of "Siemens & Halske (S & H) and the "Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (General Electricity Company) as joint undertakings for radio engineering in Berlin. It continued as a joint venture of "AEG and "Siemens AG, until Siemens left in 1941. In 1911, "Kaiser Wilhelm II sent Telefunken engineers to "West Sayville, "New York to erect three 600-foot (180-m) radio towers there. Nikola Tesla assisted in the construction. A similar station was erected in "Nauen, creating the only wireless communication between North America and Europe.

Reginald Fessenden[edit]

The invention of amplitude-modulated (AM) radio, so that more than one station can send signals (as opposed to spark-gap radio, where one transmitter covers the entire bandwidth of the spectrum) is attributed to "Reginald Fessenden and "Lee de Forest. On "Christmas Eve 1906, "Reginald Fessenden used an "Alexanderson alternator and rotary "spark-gap transmitter to make the first radio audio broadcast, from "Brant Rock, Massachusetts. Ships at sea heard a broadcast that included Fessenden playing "O Holy Night on the "violin and reading a passage from the "Bible.

Ferdinand Braun[edit]

In 1909, "Marconi and "Karl Ferdinand Braun were awarded the "Nobel Prize in Physics for "contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy".

Charles David Herrold[edit]

In April 1909 "Charles David Herrold, an electronics instructor in "San Jose, California constructed a broadcasting station. It used "spark gap technology, but modulated the carrier frequency with the human voice, and later music. The station "San Jose Calling" (there were no call letters), continued to eventually become today's "KCBS in San Francisco. Herrold, the son of a "Santa Clara Valley farmer, coined the terms "narrowcasting" and "broadcasting", respectively to identify transmissions destined for a single receiver such as that on board a ship, and those transmissions destined for a general audience. (The term "broadcasting" had been used in farming to define the tossing of seed in all directions.) Charles Herrold did not claim to be the first to transmit the human voice, but he claimed to be the first to conduct "broadcasting". To help the radio signal to spread in all directions, he designed some "omnidirectional antennas, which he mounted on the rooftops of various buildings in San Jose. Herrold also claims to be the first broadcaster to accept "advertising (he exchanged publicity for a local record store for records to play on his station), though this dubious honour usually is foisted on "WEAF (1922).

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RMS Titanic (April 2, 1912).

In 1912, the "RMS Titanic sank in the northern Atlantic Ocean. After this, wireless telegraphy using spark-gap transmitters quickly became universal on large ships. In 1913, the "International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea was convened and produced a treaty requiring shipboard radio stations to be manned 24 hours a day. A typical high-power spark gap was a rotating commutator with six to twelve contacts per wheel, nine inches (229 mm) to a foot wide, driven by about 2,000 "volts DC. As the gaps made and broke contact, the radio wave was audible as a tone in a "magnetic detector at a remote location. The telegraph key often directly made and broke the 2,000 volt supply. One side of the spark gap was directly connected to the antenna. Receivers with "thermionic valves became commonplace before spark-gap transmitters were replaced by continuous wave transmitters.

Harold J. Power[edit]

On March 8, 1916, Harold Power with his radio company American Radio and Research Company (AMRAD), broadcast the first continuous broadcast in the world from "Tufts University under the call sign 1XE (it lasted 3 hours). The company later became the first to broadcast on a daily schedule, and the first to broadcast radio dance programs, university professor lectures, the weather, and bedtime stories.[53]

Edwin Armstrong[edit]

Inventor "Edwin Howard Armstrong is credited with developing many of the features of radio as it is known today. Armstrong patented three important inventions that made today's radio possible. "Regeneration, the "superheterodyne circuit and wide-band "frequency modulation or FM. Regeneration or the use of "positive feedback greatly increased the amplitude of received radio signals to the point where they could be heard without headphones. The superhet simplified radio receivers by doing away with the need for several tuning controls. It made radios more sensitive and selective as well. FM gave listeners a static-free experience with better sound quality and fidelity than AM.

Audio broadcasting (1919 to 1950s)[edit]

Crystal sets[edit]

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In the 1920s, the "United States government publication, "Construction and Operation of a Simple Homemade Radio Receiving Outfit", showed how almost any person handy with simple tools could a build an effective "crystal radio receiver.

The most common type of receiver before vacuum tubes was the "crystal set, although some early radios used some type of amplification through electric current or battery. Inventions of the "triode amplifier, "motor-generator, and "detector enabled audio radio. The use of "amplitude modulation ("AM), with which more than one station can simultaneously send signals (as opposed to spark-gap radio, where one transmitter covers the entire bandwidth of spectra) was pioneered by Fessenden and "Lee de Forest.

The art and science of crystal sets is still pursued as a hobby in the form of simple un-amplified radios that 'runs on nothing, forever'. They are used as a teaching tool by groups such as the "Boy Scouts of America to introduce youngsters to electronics and radio. As the only energy available is that gathered by the antenna system, loudness is necessarily limited.

The first vacuum tubes[edit]

During the mid-1920s, amplifying "vacuum tubes (or thermionic valves in the UK) revolutionized "radio receivers and "transmitters. "John Ambrose Fleming developed a vacuum tube "diode. "Lee de Forest placed a screen, added a ""grid" electrode, creating the "triode. The Dutch company Nederlandsche Radio-Industrie and its owner engineer, Hanso Idzerda, made the first regular wireless broadcast for entertainment from its workshop in "The Hague on 6 November 1919. The company manufactured both transmitters and receivers. Its popular program was broadcast four nights per week on AM 670 metres,[54] until 1924 when the company ran into financial troubles.

On 27 August 1920, regular wireless broadcasts for entertainment began in "Argentina, pioneered by the group around "Enrique Telémaco Susini, and "spark gap telegraphy stopped. On 31 August 1920 the first known radio news program was broadcast by station 8MK, the unlicensed predecessor of "WWJ (AM) in "Detroit, Michigan. In 1922 regular wireless broadcasts for entertainment began in the UK from the "Marconi Research Centre "2MT at "Writtle near "Chelmsford, England. Early radios ran the entire power of the transmitter through a "carbon microphone. In the 1920s, the "Westinghouse company bought "Lee de Forest's and "Edwin Armstrong's patent. During the mid-1920s, Amplifying "vacuum tubes (US)/"thermionic valves (UK) revolutionized "radio receivers and "transmitters. Westinghouse engineers developed a more modern vacuum tube.

Political interest in the United Kingdom[edit]

The British government and the state-owned postal services found themselves under massive pressure from the wireless industry (including telegraphy) and early radio adopters to open up to the new medium. In an internal confidential report from February 25, 1924, the Imperial Wireless Telegraphy Committee stated:

"We have been asked 'to consider and advise on the policy to be adopted as regards the Imperial Wireless Services so as to protect and facilitate public interest.' It was impressed upon us that the question was urgent. We did not feel called upon to explore the past or to comment on the delays which have occurred in the building of the Empire Wireless Chain. We concentrated our attention on essential matters, examining and considering the facts and circumstances which have a direct bearing on policy and the condition which safeguard public interests."[55]

Licensed commercial public radio stations[edit]

The question of the 'first' publicly targeted licensed radio station in the U.S. has more than one answer and depends on semantics. Settlement of this 'first' question may hang largely upon what constitutes 'regular' programming.

There is the history noted above of "Charles David Herrold's radio services as early as 1909 with call signs FN, SJN, 6XF, and 6XE until 1921 when it became WKQW and then finally "KCBS in 1949.

Outside the United States there are also claims for the first radio stations:

Broadcasting was not yet supported by "advertising or listener sponsorship. The stations owned by manufacturers and department stores were established to sell radios and those owned by newspapers to sell newspapers and express the opinions of the owners. In the 1920s, radio was first used to transmit pictures visible as television. During the early 1930s, "single sideband (SSB) and "frequency modulation (FM) were invented by amateur radio operators. By 1940, they were established commercial modes.

Westinghouse was brought into the patent allies group, "General Electric, "American Telephone and Telegraph, and "Radio Corporation of America, and became a part owner of RCA. All radios made by GE and Westinghouse were sold under the RCA label 60% GE and 40% Westinghouse. ATT's "Western Electric would build radio transmitters. The patent allies attempted to set up a monopoly, but they failed due to successful competition. Much to the dismay of the patent allies, several of the contracts for inventor's patents held clauses protecting "amateurs" and allowing them to use the patents. Whether the competing manufacturers were really amateurs was ignored by these competitors.

These features arose:

FM and television start[edit]

In 1933, "FM radio was patented by inventor "Edwin H. Armstrong. FM uses "frequency modulation of the radio wave to reduce "static and "interference from electrical equipment and the atmosphere. In 1937, "W1XOJ, the first experimental FM radio station, was granted a construction permit by the US "Federal Communications Commission (FCC). In the 1930s, regular "analog television broadcasting began in some parts of Europe and North America. By the end of the decade there were roughly 25,000 all-electronic television receivers in existence worldwide, the majority of them in the UK. In the US, Armstrong's FM system was designated by the FCC to transmit and receive television sound.

FM in Europe[edit]

After World War II, "FM radio broadcasting was introduced in Germany. At a meeting in "Copenhagen in 1948, a new wavelength plan was set up for Europe. Because of the recent war, Germany (which did not exist as a state and so was not invited) was only given a small number of "medium-wave frequencies, which were not very good for broadcasting. For this reason Germany began broadcasting on UKW ("Ultrakurzwelle", i.e. ultra short wave, nowadays called "VHF) which was not covered by the Copenhagen plan. After some "amplitude modulation experience with VHF, it was realized that FM radio was a much better alternative for VHF radio than AM. Because of this history FM Radio is still referred to as "UKW Radio" in Germany. Other European nations followed a bit later, when the superior sound quality of FM and the ability to run many more local stations because of the more limited range of VHF broadcasts were realized.

Later 20th century developments[edit]

In 1954 Regency introduced a pocket "transistor radio, the "TR-1, powered by a "standard 22.5V Battery". In the early 1960s, "VOR systems finally became widespread for "aircraft navigation; before that, aircraft used commercial AM radio stations for navigation. (AM stations are still marked on U.S. "aviation charts). In 1960 "Sony introduced their first transistorized radio, small enough to fit in a vest pocket, and able to be powered by a small battery. It was durable, because there were no tubes to burn out. Over the next twenty years, transistors displaced tubes almost completely except for "picture tubes and very high power or very high frequency uses.

Color television and digital[edit]

Telex on radio[edit]

"Telegraphy did not go away on radio. Instead, the degree of automation increased. On land-lines in the 1930s, "teletypewriters automated encoding, and were adapted to pulse-code dialing to automate routing, a service called "telex. For thirty years, telex was the absolute cheapest form of long-distance communication, because up to 25 telex channels could occupy the same bandwidth as one voice channel. For business and government, it was an advantage that telex directly produced written documents.

Telex systems were adapted to short-wave radio by sending tones over "single sideband. "CCITT R.44 (the most advanced pure-telex standard) incorporated character-level error detection and retransmission as well as automated encoding and routing. For many years, telex-on-radio (TOR) was the only reliable way to reach some third-world countries. TOR remains reliable, though less-expensive forms of e-mail are displacing it. Many national telecom companies historically ran nearly pure telex networks for their governments, and they ran many of these links over short wave radio.

Documents including maps and photographs went by "radiofax, or wireless photoradiogram, invented in 1924 by "Richard H. Ranger of "Radio Corporation of America (RCA). This method prospered in the mid-20th century and faded late in the century.

Mobile phones[edit]

In 1947 AT&T commercialized the "Mobile Telephone Service. From its start in St. Louis in 1946, AT&T then introduced Mobile Telephone Service to one hundred towns and highway corridors by 1948. Mobile Telephone Service was a rarity with only 5,000 customers placing about 30,000 calls each week. Because only three radio channels were available, only three customers in any given city could make mobile telephone calls at one time.[42] Mobile Telephone Service was expensive, costing 15 USD per month, plus 0.30 to 0.40 USD per local call, equivalent to about 176 USD per month and 3.50 to 4.75 per call in 2012 USD.[43] The "Advanced Mobile Phone System "analog mobile "cell phone system, developed by "Bell Labs, was introduced in the "Americas in 1978,[44][45][46] gave much more capacity. It was the primary analog mobile phone system in "North America (and other locales) through the 1980s and into the 2000s.

Broadcast and copyright[edit]

When radio was introduced in the 1920s many predicted the end of "records. Radio was a free medium for the public to hear music for which they would normally pay. While some companies saw radio as a new avenue for promotion, others feared it would cut into profits from record sales and live performances. Many companies had their major stars sign agreements that they would not appear on radio.[62][63]

Indeed, the music recording industry had a severe drop in profits after the introduction of the radio. For a while, it appeared as though radio was a definite threat to the record industry. Radio ownership grew from two out of five homes in 1931 to four out of five homes in 1938. Meanwhile, record sales fell from $75 million in 1929 to $26 million in 1938 (with a low point of $5 million in 1933), though the economics of the situation were also affected by the "Great Depression.[64]

The copyright owners were concerned that they would see no gain from the popularity of radio and the ‘free’ music it provided. Luckily, what they needed to make this new medium work for them already existed in previous copyright law. The copyright holder for a song had control over all public performances ‘for profit.’ The problem now was proving that the radio industry, which was just figuring out for itself how to make money from advertising and currently offered free music to anyone with a receiver, was making a profit from the songs.

The "test case was against "Bamberger's Department Store in "Newark, New Jersey in 1922. The store was broadcasting music throughout its store on the radio station WOR. No advertisements were heard, except at the beginning of the broadcast which announced "L. Bamberger and Co., One of America's Great Stores, Newark, New Jersey." It was determined through this and previous cases (such as the lawsuit against Shanley's Restaurant) that Bamberger was using the songs for commercial gain, thus making it a public performance for profit, which meant the copyright owners were due payment.

With this ruling the "American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) began collecting licensing fees from radio stations in 1923. The beginning sum was $250 for all music protected under ASCAP, but for larger stations the price soon ballooned to $5,000. Edward Samuels reports in his book The Illustrated Story of Copyright that "radio and TV licensing represents the single greatest source of revenue for ASCAP and its composers […] and [a]n average member of ASCAP gets about $150–$200 per work per year, or about $5,000-$6,000 for all of a member's compositions." Not long after the Bamberger ruling, ASCAP had to once again defend their right to charge fees, in 1924. The Dill Radio Bill would have allowed radio stations to play music without paying and licensing fees to ASCAP or any other music-licensing corporations. The bill did not pass.[65]

Exotic technologies[edit]

See also[edit]

Histories
General

Many contributed to wireless. Individuals that helped to further the science include, among others:

Categories

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Invention of Radio inventors.about.com/od/rstartinventions/a/radio.htm
  2. ^ a b "Maxwell". sparkmuseum.com. 
  3. ^ a b "Newton to Einstein: The Trail of Light". Retrieved 11 December 2015. 
  4. ^ "22. Word Origins". earlyradiohistory.us. 
  5. ^ W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age, page 125-126
  6. ^ Sungook Hong, Wireless: From Marconi's Black-box to the Audion, MIT Press, 2001, page 2
  7. ^ "Nikola Tesla: The Guy Who DIDN'T "Invent Radio"". earlyradiohistory.us. 
  8. ^ a b Sungook Hong, Wireless: From Marconi's Black-box to the Audion, MIT Press, 2001, pages 5-10
  9. ^ T. K. Sarkar, Robert Mailloux, Arthur A. Oliner, M. Salazar-Palma, Dipak L. Sengupta, History of Wireless, page 271
  10. ^ Bishop, Don. "Who Invented Radio?". Retrieved 2006-02-24. 
  11. ^ Rybak, James P. "Alexander Popov: Russia's Radio Pioneer". Archived from the original on April 12, 2014. 
  12. ^ a b c Icons of invention: the makers of the modern world from Gutenberg to Gates. ABC-CLIO. Retrieved 07-08-2011.  Check date values in: |access-date= ("help)
  13. ^ G. R. M. Garratt, The Early History of Radio: From Faraday to Marconi, IET - 1994, page 27
  14. ^ "Maxwell's Predictions and Hertz' Confirmation". Boundless. 
  15. ^ "Electromagnetism". uoregon.edu. 
  16. ^ Edison, his life and inventions By Frank Lewis Dyer, Thomas Commerford Martin. Page 830.
  17. ^ Peter Rowlands, Oliver Lodge and the Liverpool Physical Society, Liverpool University Press, 1990, page 24
  18. ^ Electric waves; being research on the propagation of electric action with finite velocity through space by Heinrich Rudolph Hertz, Daniel Evan Jones 1 Review Macmillan and co., 1893. Pages1 - 5
  19. ^ "Hertzian Waves (1901)". Retrieved 2008-08-11. 
  20. ^ Radio: Brian Regal, The Life Story of a Technology, page 22. Books.google.com. Retrieved 2014-08-02. 
  21. ^ W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age, page 132
  22. ^ W. Bernard Carlson, Tesla: Inventor of the Electrical Age, page 127
  23. ^ Mukherji, Visvapriya, Jagadish Chandra Bose, second edition, 1994, Builders of Modern India series, Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, "Government of India, "ISBN "81-230-0047-2
  24. ^ Журнал Русского физико-химического общества. Т. XXVII. Вып. 8. С. 259 — декабрь 1895
  25. ^ Лачинов Д. А. Основы метеорологии и климатологии. — СПб, 1895. С. 460
  26. ^ Rzhosnitsky B. N. Dmitry Aleksandrovich Lachinov. Moscow-Leningrad: Gosenergoizdat, 1955 / Ржонсницкий Б. Н. Дмитрий Александрович Лачинов. — М.—Л.: Госэнергоиздат, 1955 (in Russian)
  27. ^ Icons of invention: the makers of the modern world from Gutenberg to Gates. ABC-CLIO. Retrieved 07-08-2011.  Check date values in: |access-date= ("help), page 162
  28. ^ Sungook Hong, Wireless: From Marconi's Black-box to the Audion, MIT Press, 2001. page 22
  29. ^ Sungook Hong, Wireless: From Marconi's Black-box to the Audion, MIT Press, 2001. page 20-22
  30. ^ The Saturday review of politics, literature, science and art, Volume 93. "THE INVENTOR OF WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY: A REPLY. To the Editor of the Saturday Review" Guglielmo Marconi and "WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY: A REJOINDER. To the Editor of the Saturday Review," "Silvanus P. Thompson.
  31. ^ "MARCONI E LO STRAVOLGIMENTO DELLA VERITÀ STORICA SULLA SUA OPERA". 
  32. ^ Proceedings of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, Volume 28 By Institution of Electrical Engineers. page 294.
  33. ^ http://transition.fcc.gov/omd/history/radio/documents/short_history.pdf
  34. ^ Sungook Hong, Wireless: From Marconi's Black-box to the Audion, MIT Press, 2001, page 13
  35. ^ "Nobel Prizes and Laureates - Guglielmo Marconi". NobelPrize.org. Retrieved 12 May 2014. 
  36. ^ Note: A 1943 "United States Supreme Court "Marconi Wireless Tel. Co. v. United States", a case on the U.S. government's use of Marconi Co. patents during World War One, invalidated some of Marconi's patents issued on the refinement of his system on the basis that the adoption of adjustable transformers in the transmitting and receiving circuits, which was an improvement of the initial invention, was anticipated by patents issued to "Oliver Lodge, "John Stone Stone, and "Nikola Tesla. (This decision was not unanimous, the dissenters siding with Marconi). The court specifically stated their decision didn't overturn Marconi's original radio patents or have any bearing on Marconi as the inventor of radio. Thomas H. White, Nikola Tesla: The Guy Who DIDN'T "Invent Radio", earlyradiohistory.us, November 1, 2012
  37. ^ "Father Roberto Landell de Moura". highfields-arc.co.uk. Archived from the original on July 24, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b c "Radio Broadcasting". W2uc.union.edu. Archived from the original on May 15, 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  39. ^ "Union College Magazine". 2000.union.edu. Archived from the original on 2009-01-25. Retrieved 2009-07-22. 
  40. ^ Sciullo Jr, Sam, ed. (1991). 1991 Pitt Football: University of Pittsburgh Football Media Guide. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Sports Information Office. p. 116. 
  41. ^ AM stations are still marked on U.S. aviation charts
  42. ^ a b Gordon A. Gow, Richard K. Smith Mobile and wireless communications: an introduction, McGraw-Hill International, 2006 "ISBN "0-335-21761-3 page 23
  43. ^ a b "1946: First Mobile Telephone Call". corp.att.com. AT&T Intellectual Property. 2011. Retrieved 2012-04-24. 
  44. ^ a b AT&T Tech Channel (2011-06-13). "AT&T Archives : Testing the First Public Cell Phone Network". Techchannel.att.com. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  45. ^ a b Private Line.
  46. ^ a b MilestonesPast.
  47. ^ "Transistor Radios". ScienCentral. 1999. Retrieved 2010-01-19. 
  48. ^ "Noticias, Últimas noticias, El español Julio Cervera Baviera, y no Marconi, fue quien inventó la radio, según el profesor Ángel Faus . Universidad de Navarra.". unav.es.  horizontal tab character in |title= at position 136 ("help)
  49. ^ "Un estudio asegura que fue el español Cervera Baviera y no Marconi el inventor de la radio - comunicación - elmundo.es". elmundo.es. 
  50. ^ "Portada. Universidad de Navarra". unav.es. Archived from the original on February 11, 2012. 
  51. ^ Domenico Mazzotto, Wireless Telegraphy and Telephony. Translated by Selimo Romeo Bottone (Whittaker & Co., 1906), 217.
  52. ^ http://www.coit.es/foro/pub/ficheros/librosapendice_1_981ff066.pdf?PHPSESSID=c3606fd8d59137417f50e69e7d8f8566
  53. ^ "North Hall." Concise Encyclopedia of Tufts History. Ed. Anne Sauer
  54. ^ Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant 05 nov. 1919, page 16
  55. ^ Report of the Imperial Wireless Telegraphy Committee, 1924. Presented to Parliament by Command of His Majesty. "National Archives, London, Reference: CAB 24/165/38
  56. ^ A Tower in Babel, pp. 62-64
  57. ^ Larry Wolters, "Radio Illusions Dispelled By DeForest." Chicago Tribune, 13 September 1936, p. SW 7
  58. ^ "Radio's Anniversary," Boston Globe, 30 September 1928, p. B27.
  59. ^ "Highbridge Station Reports (1917)". earlyradiohistory.us. 
  60. ^ "The Boston Radio Archives: The Rise and Fall of WGI". bostonradio.org. 
  61. ^ Future of IoT will be ‘smart dust’, says Cambridge Consultants
  62. ^ liebowitz.dvi
  63. ^ "Inside The Music Industry - Chronology - Technology And The Music Industry - The Way The Music Died - FRONTLINE - PBS". pbs.org. 
  64. ^ "Creativity Wants to be Paid". edwardsamuels.com. 
  65. ^ "Chapter Two". edwardsamuels.com. 

References[edit]

Primary sources[edit]

Secondary sources[edit]

Media and documentaries[edit]

External links[edit]

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