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IFMAR 1:10 Electric Off-Road World Championship
First race 1985
Duration 3 rounds of 5 minute heats (A-main)
1 round of 5 minute heat (others)
Most wins (driver) 2WD = "Masami Hirosaka (3)
4WD = "Masami Hirosaka (4)
Most wins (manufacturer) 2WD = "Associated Electrics (12)
4WD = "Yokomo (7)
Circuit information
Surface Dirt (1985–1991, 1995, 2002, 2005)
"Clay (1993, 1997–1999, 2007–2011)
Blue groove (2003, 2013)
"Artificial turf (2015)

The "IFMAR World Championship for 1:10th Electric Off-Road Cars (officially "IFMAR 1:10 Electric Off-Road World Championship"), is a world championship radio controlled car race hosted by the "International Federation of Model Auto Racing (IFMAR). It takes place biennially on odd years since 1987 in its current format but inaugurated in 1985 as a championship for Stock (stock handout motor) and Modified class (modified motors and seven cells)[1] It is considered by the radio-controlled modelling industry to be the most prestigious event in the calendar that a number of mainstream hobby and toy brands have fielded factory entries.

The event is open exclusively to "1:10 scale electric off-road buggies with those of "2WD and "4WD drivetrain, competing separately. These are characterized by its large wheels designed for off-road driving and enclosed single-seater bodyshell with large rear spoiler.

Despite taking place under the same host and venue, the two championships are regarded as separate events, therefore in between them, the circuit is required to be rebuilt and reconfigured differently.

All the world championships took place on dirt or clay tracks until "2015 when the decision was made to run controversially on "artificial turf.[2]

In the 2WD class "Associated Electrics, holds distinction for the most wins for manufacturers with a total of 11; "Masami Hirosaka of Japan, hold the record with three wins. In the 4WD class "Yokomo holds distinction for the most wins for manufacturers; Hirosaka, holding the record with three wins.

Contents

Significance to the other Worlds events[edit]

As it is considered by the industry to be the most prestigious event in radio-controlled modelling, in an attempt to "generate sale revenue from their products”,[3] it has attracted some of the biggest brands from the hobby and toy industries that included "Nikko,[3] "Tomy,[4] "Tamiya[3] and "Traxxas.[5] Only the latter two had greater success at the A-mains with Tamiya achieving 2nd by Lee Martin in 2013[6] and Scott Montgomery’s 8th for Traxxas in 1991, both in 2WD.

At the 1989 Worlds, it was claimed by Radio Control Car Action that virtually every manufacturers, who had a 1:10 buggy on the market, was represented. In a bid to defend their 4WD title the same year; "Schumacher, a title sponsor, handed out their latest car, the Top Cat, to any contender who was interested in representing them.[3]

As a number of manufacturers spend a large sums of money to prepare their teams to ensure a win, as a result a number of those enforce secrecy to protect their prototypes from view. In one notable example, Team Associated, who was the only brand to field a prototype, refused to allow it to be photographed, covering their RC10 up with a towel on anybody who tried to and when forced an Australian team member to hand his film over as he managed to take a few shot of its exposed chassis during technical inspection. Losi in comparison managed to escape scrutiny as experimental two-speed transmission was kept secret and gave misleading answers to prying eyes. They switched to their conventional transmissions in the finals.[3] By the time of the 1991 Worlds, this practice was enforced by a majority of manufacturers.[7] This was in contrast to the 1986 IFMAR 1:8 IC Off-Road World Championship, when Japanese entrants from "Kyosho clearly knew their outdated cars had little chance against their European competitors, freely took numerous photographs of their competitor's cars to benefit their research. The outcome became the "Burns in late-1987 and then, at the turn of the decade came the highly successful Inferno series that dominated racing from then on.[8]

To prepare for the 1989 event, "Yokomo technicians famously collected soil sample on the track for analysis back in Japan. They were allegedly spotted by locals wheeling around the circuit, a cart that had a video camera mounted on it to get a car’s eye view of the track. The end result was a duplicate of the track that became the Yatabe Arena back home.[3] Nowadays, regulation require the circuit to be altered at over 60% of its layout, had it been used prior to commencement date and closed for a 2-day minimum, 3-day maximum prior to then.[9][10]

Good preparation is key to winning as opposed to accessibility to prototype arts as Associated learned in 1993; when they felt their standard issue, aluminium chassis RC10 was best suited to the circuit, mechanics proceeded to modify Brian Kinwald’s chassis by rounding it’s square edges. It’s suspension arms was molded from a more rigid graphite.[11]

Teams and drivers are prepared to bend rules in an attempt to win. In 1989, Yokomo's TR-31 tires, only made available to Yokomo and Associated drivers, became a subject of scrutiny due to its size, given the rate of speed its Yokomos and Associated were going.

The tires, were 2 1/4 inches tall (equivalent to 22 inch in full scale) which was illegal under ROAR regulation (maximum 2 inches) though IFMAR did not have such restrictions and was shipped in 30 boxes of tires from Japan. In comparison, Associated was quick to point out to the critics that at the 1987 Worlds, Kyosho fielded tires on its Ultima that was too wide for ROAR regulations.

Team Losi in retaliation, countered this by taking all the stops in the States to produce and ship over 100 pairs of oversize front tires, 200 pairs of rears and five sets of hand-machined aluminum wheels across the Pacific. The tires, only permitted on its "JR-X2, ended with mixed results for drivers as the rim ended up being bent out of shape and discarded for Losi's standard wheel.[12][3]

Some who attempted to bend the rules were not lucky such as at the 1993 Worlds; the electric motor of "Ben Sturnham's Schumacher CAT 2000 was found with a hybrid motor illegal under IFMAR regulation regardless if it was compliant with the host country "BRCA's regulations, his Tanaplan motor consisted of parts by other manufacturer of approved motors including Epic can and "armature with "Yokomo endbell. Sturnham had his 3rd-place finish demoted to a 10th place after all his lap times was removed despite protests by Tanaplan's Martin Finnesey that it offered no performance enhancement.CITEREFHowell1993[13]

Schedule[edit]

A maximum of 150 drivers take part, each continental blocs allocated 32 entries each, the host bloc an extra 10 and the final 10 allocated by IFMAR themselves; should any allocation be left unused, it would be reallocated to the remaining blocs. The event take place over eight days in total with the first reserved for competitor's registration followed by its opening ceremony in the afternoon then the two sets of three days for competitions.

The competitions begin with a minimum of six practice rounds over groups of fifteen consisting of ten drivers each, starting with the less experienced, this determine the number of heats required and the minimum time needed between rounds.[14] Each heats consists of drivers who are ranked in order of priority; final ranking in the previous Worlds, then those of each countries and the domestic entrants and additional entries.[15] In this case, in the 2015 Worlds, debutants Spencer Rivkin and Bruno Coehlo started at the lower-to-mid practice group 6 and 11 respectively, whereas Steven Hartson, "Jared Tebo, "Naoto Matsukura and Lee Martin start together in group 15 as the former two are defending champions and the latter given their performance or "seeding in their home blocs whereas Travis Amezcua and David Ronnefalk, despite appearing at the A-main once previously, starts in practice group 14.[15] Usually the final rounds are used as controlled practice.[14] At the 2015 Worlds, practice rounds consisted of four rounds of open practice and two rounds of seeding practice to group the drivers together by skill levels.[16] The second day of competition, following the second controlled practice, consists of four rounds of qualifying heats and for day three; the final qualifying session and race day. For each qualifying session, a group of up to ten cars start under the "staggered start" system (a driver each starting separately within of one second of being called).[17]

After each 5 minute qualifying session, the best qualifier of the round is awarded zero points, 2 and 3 points for the 2nd and 3rd fastest qualifier and so on with the most points given to the slowest qualifier. Of five rounds in total, the best three overall performances (as opposed to lap times in full-sized motorsport) counts toward the driver's overall performance, two best rounds counts toward three or four rounds completed and one round count toward two or one rounds. After all the points is totaled up, the driver with the least points is the best qualifier, thus is awarded a "TQ (Top Qualifier) spot, enabling them to start in front of each rounds. Should they tie in points with another driver, the one with the lowest points score of the three is used to break the tie, if this fails, then the next set of points will be used until the tie is broken. If the points fail to break the tie, then the driver's laps and time from the lowest score will be used.[18]

The groups are then split into ten groups of ten drivers in alphabets, pending on their performance in qualifying with A being the fastest of the groups[19] Race day starts with the slowest groups first, working its way to the next faster groups up to the fastest, the A-main, then progresses to the 2nd heat. Each race run for a total of five minutes with an extra time to allow the driver to complete their laps.[20] Only the A-main, the group that carries the only hope of taking the world championship title, have three heats with only two best performances that counts and a final practice in the afternoon during race day[21][22] and the rest run under a single 5 minute heat.[16]

Following the conclusion of the first championship, the event will have an off day as the circuit would have to be rebuilt and reconfigured to a different layout required by IFMAR regulations as accordingly the two Worlds are considered to be a separate events.[23] The practice would instead start with drivers who are ranked according to their performance in 2WD the day before.[24]

IFMAR World Championship Winners[edit]

2WD[edit]

Year Bloc Name Car Motor ESC Transmitter Host Club Venue Location Surface Source Report
1985 ROAR "United States Jay Halsey "Associated RC10 Reedy "Novak NESC-1 "Novak Ranch Pit Shop Ranch Pit Shop "Del Mar, "San Diego, "California  "United States Dirt [25][26] Report
1987 EFRA "United States Joel Johnson "Kyosho Ultima Trinity Monster Pure Gold "Novak NER-2X "KO Propo EX-1 Romsey Off-Road Club Malthouse Inn "Romsey, "Hampshire  "United Kingdom Dirt [27] Report
1989 FEMCA "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Associated RC10GX Reedy "KO Propo CX-III "KO Propo Esprit Castle Hill Off Road Radio Control Club St. Ives Showground "St Ives, New South Wales  "Australia Dirt [28] Report
1991 ROAR "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Associated RC10GX Reedy "Novak 410-M1c "KO Propo Team SEMROCC Racing Freedom Hill Park "Sterling Heights, Michigan  "United States Dirt [29] Report
1993 EFRA "United States Brian Kinwald "Associated RC10 Reedy "Novak 410-M1c "Airtronics CS2P Thames Estuary Model Auto Circuits Pipps Hill Leisure Complex "Basildon, "Essex  "United Kingdom Dirt [30][31] Report
1995 FEMCA "United States Matt Francis "Associated RC10B2 Reedy Sonic LRP ICS Digital "Airtronics Caliber 3Ps JMRCA Kanto Yatabe Arena "Tsukuba, Ibaraki  "Japan Dirt [32] Report
1997 ROAR "United States Brian Kinwald "Losi XX-CR Trinity "Novak Cyclone "Airtronics Ranch Pit Shop Ranch Pit Shop "Pomona, California  "United States Dirt [33] Report
1999 EFRA "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Associated RC10B3 Reedy "GM Racing V12 "KO Propo Esprit Vantage Rauman Urheiluautoilijat Uimahalli "Rauma, "Satakunta  "Finland Dirt [34] Report
2002 FAMAR "United States Matt Francis "Losi XXX Trinity LRP "Airtronics M8 Tshwane Raceway And Promotions Skilpad Tortoise Hall "Pretoria  "South Africa Dirt [nb 1][35] Report
2003 ROAR "United States Billy Easton "Associated RC10B4 Reedy Rx LRP QC2 "Airtronics M8 Minnreg RC Car Club Minnreg RC Speedway "Largo, Florida  "United States Dirt [36] Report
2005 EFRA "United Kingdom Neil Cragg "Associated RC10B4 Reedy Ti Nosram Razor "KO Propo EX-10 AF Model Rings AF Model Rings "Collegno  "Italy Dirt [37] Report
2007 FEMCA "Japan Hayato Matsuzaki "Associated RC10B4 Checkpoint "KO Propo VFS-1 Pro Competition 3 "KO Propo EX-10 Helios C2 Hakusan Ichirino RC Club Hakusan Arena "Ishikawa  "Japan Dirt [38] "Report
2009 FAMAR "Germany Martin Achter "Associated RC10B4 CS Magnetic Delta CS Rocket Competition "Sanwa EXZES Plus Tshwane Raceway and Promotions TRAP R/C Venue "Pretoria  "South Africa Dirt [39] "Report
2011 EFRA "United States Ryan Cavalieri "Associated RC10B4.1 Team Orion Vortex VST Pro LRP SXX "Airtronics M11X Vaasan Urheiluautoilijat Pitkämäki Race-Centre "Vaasa  "Finland Clay [40] Report
2013 ROAR "United States "Jared Tebo "Kyosho Ultima RB6 Team Orion Vortex VST2 Team Orion Vortex R10 "KO Propo EX-10 Eurus A-Main Hobbies Silver Dollar R/C Raceway "Chico, California  "United States Clay [41] Report
2015 FEMCA "United States Spencer Rivkin "Associated RC10B5M Reedy Sonic Mach 2 Reedy Blackbox 410R "Airtronics M12S JMRCA Kanto Yatabe Arena "Tsukuba, Ibaraki  "Japan Astroturf [42] "Report
2017 FEMCA "United States "Ryan Maifield "Yokomo YZ-2 DTM Team Orion Vortex VST2 Team Orion HMX "Airtronics M12S 3-Circles ARC International Raceway "Xiamen, "Fujian  "China Dirt [43] "Report

4WD[edit]

Year Bloc Name Car Motor ESC Transmitter Host Club Venue Location Surface Source Report
1985 ROAR "United States Gil Losi, Jr. "Yokomo "YZ-834B Trinity "Novak NESC-1 "Airtronics Ranch Pit Shop Ranch Pit Shop "Del Mar, "San Diego, "California  "United States Hardpack [25][26] Report
1987 EFRA "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Schumacher CAT XL HPI UNO Blue Label "KO Propo CX-I "KO Propo Esprit Romsey Off-Road Club Malthouse Inn "Romsey, "Hampshire  "United Kingdom Hardpack [27] Report
1989 FEMCA "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Yokomo YZ-870C Reedy "KO Propo CX-III "KO Propo Esprit Castle Hill Off Road Radio Control Club St. Ives Showground "St Ives, New South Wales  "Australia Hardpack [28] Report
1991 ROAR "United States "Cliff Lett "Yokomo YZ-10 Works '91 Reedy Mr. M "Novak 410-M1c "Airtronics Team SEMROCC Racing Freedom Hill Park "Sterling Heights, Michigan  "United States [29] Report
1993 EFRA "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Yokomo YZ-10 WC Special Reedy "Novak 410-HPc "KO Propo Esprit II Thames Estuary Model Auto Circuits Pipps Hill Leisure Complex "Basildon, "Essex  "United Kingdom [30][31] Report
1995 FEMCA "United States Mark Pavidis "Yokomo YZ-10 Reedy Sonic LRP ICS Digital "Airtronics CS2P JMRCA Kanto Yatabe Arena "Tsukuba, Ibaraki  "Japan [32] Report
1997 ROAR "Japan "Masami Hirosaka "Yokomo MX-4 Reedy Tekin M-Star Red "KO Propo Ranch Pit Shop Ranch Pit Shop "Pomona, California  "United States Hardpack [33] Report
1999 EFRA "Finland Jukka Steenari "Losi XX-4 Team Orion "Novak Cyclone "Sanwa M8 Rauman Urheiluautoilijat Uimahalli "Rauma  "Finland [34] Report
2002 FAMAR "Finland Jukka Steenari "Losi XX-4 Orion Novak "Sanwa Tshwane Raceway And Promotions Skilpad Tortoise Hall "Pretoria  "South Africa [nb 1][44] Report
2003 ROAR "United States Ryan Cavalieri "Losi XXX-4 Trinity "Novak GTX "Airtronics M8 Minnreg RC Car Club Minnreg RC Speedway "Largo, Florida  "United States [45] Report
2005 EFRA "United States Ryan Cavalieri JConcepts BJ4 Worlds Edition Trinity Epic Shock LRP QC3 "Airtronics M11 AF Model Rings AF Model Rings "Collegno, "Piedmont  "Italy [37] Report
2007 FEMCA "United States "Jared Tebo "Associated RC10B44 Checkpoint LRP QC3 Futaba 3PK Super Hakusan Ichirino RC Club Hakusan Arena "Hakusan, "Ishikawa  "Japan Clay [46] "Report
2009 FAMAR "Germany Martin Achter "Team Durango DEX410 CS Magnetic Delta CS Rocket Competition "Sanwa EXZES Plus Tshwane Raceway and Promotions TRAP R/C Venue "Pretoria, "Gauteng  "South Africa [47] "Report
2011 EFRA "United States Ryan Cavalieri "Associated RC10B44.1 Orion Vortex VST Pro Orion Vortex R10 Pro "Airtronics M11X Vaasan Urheiluautoilijat Pitkämäki Race-Centre "Vaasa, "Ostrobothnia  "Finland [48] Report
2013 ROAR "United States Steven Hartson "Associated RC10B44.2 LRP Vector X20 LRP Flow WorksTeam Futaba 4PKS-R A-Main Hobbies Silver Dollar R/C Raceway "Chico, California  "United States [49] Report
2015 FEMCA "Portugal Bruno Coelho XRAY XB4 16 LRP Vector X20 LRP Flow WorksTeam "Sanwa M12S JMRCA Kanto Yatabe Arena "Tsukuba, Ibaraki  "Japan "Artificial turf "Report
2017 FEMCA "United States Ryan Maifield Yokomo YZ-4 SF Team Orion VST2 Team Orion HMX Airtronics M12S 3-Circles ARC International Raceway "Xiamen, "Fujian  "China "Dirt [43] "Report

Statistics[edit]

Most Wins[edit]

Drivers[edit]

Car manufacturers[edit]

Motors[edit]

ESC[edit]

Transmitters[edit]

By Member Blocs (Drivers)[edit]

Win(s) by Nations (Drivers)[edit]

Most represented in final[edit]

Note: Italics on year represents in which a driver of the country or car manufacturer who failed to score a championship title, italics on nationalities indicate host nation.

Nations (drivers)[edit]

Car manufacturers[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Because of the "September 11 attacks which occurred prior to the championships, the event was "delayed until 2002.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1/10th World Championships" (PDF). Rc10talk.com. Retrieved 2015-08-25. 
  2. ^ "Track Focus – Yatabe Arena » Red RC – Events". Events.redrc.net. Retrieved 2015-11-05. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Houle 1990, pp. 41-56.
  4. ^ Huber 1991, pp. 107-111.
  5. ^ Waldron, Aaron. "FLASHBACK FRIDAY: Traxxas' racing heyday". LiveRC.com. Retrieved 2017-04-30. 
  6. ^ "Lee Martin Takes 2nd at 2013 IFMAR Electric Worlds!". Retrieved 14 June 2016. 
  7. ^ Pond 1991, pp. 38-56.
  8. ^ NeoBuggyA 2012.
  9. ^ IFMAR 2015, 1.5.4.
  10. ^ IFMAR 2015, 1.5.1.
  11. ^ Howellb 1993, pp. A7-A15.
  12. ^ Husting 1990, pp. 47-50, 80-82.
  13. ^ "RC10Talk.com - View topic - 1993 IFMAR Worlds Radio Race Car-Oct 1993". rc10talk.com. 
  14. ^ a b 1.51, p2, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  15. ^ a b https://2015epoffroadworlds.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/2wd-preliminary-starting-order1.pdf
  16. ^ a b "WORLDS: Live broadcast schedule for 2015 IFMAR Electric Off-Road World Championships :: LiveRC.com – R/C Car News, Pictures, Videos, and More". liverc.com. 
  17. ^ 1.10.8, p5, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  18. ^ 1.7, p4, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  19. ^ 1.8, p4-5, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  20. ^ 1.10.3, p4-5, IFMAR 1/10 Off-Road 2015 Rules
  21. ^ 1.8.1, p5, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  22. ^ 1.8.4, p5, IFMAR 1/10 2015 Off-Road Rules
  23. ^ "'From Race Control' – Day 3 of 2WD Buggy » Red RC – Events". Redrc.net. Retrieved 2015-08-25. 
  24. ^ https://2015epoffroadworlds.files.wordpress.com/2015/10/4wd-preliminary-starting-order1.pdf
  25. ^ a b Tobey, Mike (September–October 1985). "1/10 Off-Road World Championships". Radio Race Car. 
  26. ^ a b "RC10Talk.com - View topic - Jammin Jays 4WD Prototype RC10". rc10talk.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  27. ^ a b Blandin, Denis (October 1987). "Championnat du Monde Romsey" (PDF). Auto8 (in French) (27). 
  28. ^ a b Hustings, Gene (December 1989). "1989 1/10 Off-Road World Champs". Radio Race Car. 
  29. ^ a b Chaplin, Keith (October 1991). "1991 1/10 Off-Road World Championships". Radio Race Car. 
  30. ^ a b RCMC team (November 1993). "Kinwald King Masami: Amazing (part 1/2)". Radio Control Model Cars. Radio Control Model Cars,
  31. ^ a b RCMC team (November 1993). "Kinwald King Masami: Amazing (part 2/2)". Radio Control Model Cars. 
  32. ^ a b Husting, Gene (November 1995). "Yet Associated and Yokomo Dominate: The 1995 IFMAR 1/10 Off-Road World Championships". Radio Race Car. 
  33. ^ a b Howell, John (December 1997). "1997 IFMAR Off-Road Worlds". Radio Control Car Action. "Air Age Media. 
  34. ^ a b "IFMAR Off-Road Worlds" (PDF). R/C Car. November 1999. 
  35. ^ Lionel Troyon / adaptaweb. "RC Infos ¦ Site informatif sur le modélisme". rcinfos.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  36. ^ Lionel Troyon / adaptaweb. "RC Infos ¦ Site informatif sur le modélisme". rcinfos.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  37. ^ a b Higgins, Matt; Vieira, Peter (November 2005). "IFMAR Electric Off-Road Worlds". Radio Control Car Action. Retrieved 2015-08-25. 
  38. ^ "2007 IFMAR off road world championships - Japan - oOple.com". oople.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  39. ^ "EP Off Road 2WD Progress Report". Web.archive.org. Archived from the original on December 13, 2009. Retrieved 2015-07-26. 
  40. ^ "Cavalieri gets his 2WD World title » Red RC – Events". redrc.net. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  41. ^ "Jared Tebo is 2WD World Champion". neobuggy.net. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  42. ^ "Rivkin takes 2WD title at Yatabe". neobuggy.net. 
  43. ^ a b "China to host 2017 IFMAR EP Offroad Worlds". Red RC. Retrieved 2016-09-03. 
  44. ^ Lionel Troyon / adaptaweb. "RC Infos ¦ Site informatif sur le modélisme". rcinfos.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  45. ^ Lionel Troyon / adaptaweb. "RC Infos ¦ Site informatif sur le modélisme". rcinfos.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  46. ^ "2007 IFMAR off road world championships - Japan - oOple.com". oople.com. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  47. ^ Henk Lamberts. "4WD Report". trap.co.za. Archived from the original on 9 October 2011. 
  48. ^ "Neumann & Tebo join Cavalieri on World Championship podium » Red RC – Events". redrc.net. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  49. ^ "Hartson wins A3 Thriller: World Champion". neobuggy.net. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 

Bibliography[edit]

  1. ^ Howell 1993, p. A15.
  2. ^ Howellb 1993, pp. A7-A15.
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