Powered by
TTSReader
Share this page on
Article provided by Wikipedia


Main article: "Kansai-kan of the National Diet Library

Kansai-kan (Kansai Library), which opened in Kyoto Prefecture in 2002, is the second facility of the NDL.

The NDL has transferred the following collections to the Kansai-kan: most western periodicals; books and other materials in non-Japanese Asian languages; certain scientific and technological materials (technical reports, papers of foreign academic societies, catalogs of Japanese and foreign technical standards, foreign doctoral dissertations, and conference proceedings in Western languages); scientific research reports compiled under grants from the "Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology; Japanese doctoral dissertations; and books on tape.[4]

National Diet Library online resources[edit]

The National Diet Library has in recent years compiled a detailed website in both Japanese [5] and English.[6] Its online databases consist of the National Diet Library Online Public Access Catalog (NDL-OPAC), the Digital Library of the Meiji Era, the Rare Books Image Database, and the Minutes of the Imperial Diet and National Diet.

National Diet Library Online Public Access Catalog (NDL-OPAC)[edit]

The NDL provides an Online Public Access Catalog (OPAC), by which users can search the NDL's entire collection from anywhere in the world in either English[7] or Japanese.[8] Using OPAC to identify sources and catalog numbers, overseas users may obtain certain materials from the NDL through "interlibrary loan.[9] In addition, the NDL provides a fee-based reproduction service for scholars residing overseas.[10]

Digital Library from the Meiji Era[edit]

One of the most important features of the NDL's website is the Digital Library of the Meiji Era (近代デジタルライブラリー Kindai dejitaru raiburarii"?, lit. Recent Age Digital Library).[11] The Digital Library is the digital descendant of the Maruzen Meiji Microfilm, the product of an ambitious project to microfilm the NDL's entire collection of Meiji era books, a collection of some 60,000 volumes. The digital library contains actual images of these works, which are divided into ten main categories based on "Nippon Decimal Classification (NDC) : (0) general (総記 sōki"?); (1) philosophy (哲学 tetsugaku"?); (2) history (歴史 rekishi"?); (3) social sciences (社会科学 shakai kagaku"?); (4) natural sciences (自然科学 shizen kagaku"?); (5) engineering and manufacturing (工学・工業 kōgaku/kōgyō"?); (6) industry (産業 sangyō"?); (7) arts and athletics (芸術・体育 geijutsu/taiiku"?); (8) language (語学 gogaku"?); and (9) literature (文学 bungaku"?). The images are not coded, so text searches are not possible; however, Japanese-language searches for the title, author, publisher, subject, and table of contents of the works in the database are possible. Meiji period periodicals are not included in this collection.

Rare Books Image Database[edit]

The NDL's website also contains the Rare Books Image Database (貴重書画像データベース kichōsho gazō dētabēsu"?) a collection of digital images from 37,000 illustrated books published before the Edo Period. Japanese-language searches by title, author, and call-number are possible in this database.[12]

Minutes of the Imperial Diet and National Diet[edit]

The NDL provides a database of the minutes of both the Imperial Diet and the National Diet, the only one of the NDL's online database that is full-text searchable. All minutes from the National Diet's inception in May 1947 through the present are searchable online.[13] At present, only minutes from the last two (91st and 92nd) sessions of the Imperial Diet (November 1946 through May 1947) are available.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sawako Hanyu appointed new Librarian of the National Diet Library". National Diet Library. Retrieved 2016-12-12. 
  2. ^ a b "Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan shōshi" (in Japanese). Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan. Retrieved 13 January 2011. 
  3. ^ This was the ground of the German Embassy since Meiji-Times. It was confiscated in 1945 and not given back.
  4. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/service/kansai/index.html
  5. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp
  6. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/
  7. ^ http://opac.ndl.go.jp/index_e.html
  8. ^ http://opac.ndl.go.jp/index.html
  9. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/service/oversea/data_loan.html
  10. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/service/oversea/data_copy.html
  11. ^ http://www.ndl.go.jp/en/data/endl.html
  12. ^ http://rarebook.ndl.go.jp/pre/servlet/pre_com_menu.jsp
  13. ^ http://kokkai.ndl.go.jp/
  14. ^ http://teikokugikai-i.ndl.go.jp/

Sources[edit]

This article is based on information obtained from the National Diet Library website. The section on the formation of the NDL under the U.S. Occupation forces relies heavily on Leslie Pincus, "Revolution in the Archives of Memory: The Founding of the National Diet Library in Occupied Japan" in Francis X. Blouin and William G. Rosenberg, eds., Archives, Documentation, and Institutions of Social Memory: Essays from the Sawyer Seminar (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2006).

External links[edit]

) )