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Main article: "Jefferson Lecture

Since 1972 the NEH has sponsored the "Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, which it describes as "the highest honor the federal government confers for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities." The Jefferson Lecturer is selected each year by the National Council on the Humanities. The honoree delivers a lecture in Washington, D.C., during the spring, and receives an honorarium of $10,000. The stated purpose of the honor is to recognize "an individual who has made significant scholarly contributions in the humanities and who has the ability to communicate the knowledge and wisdom of the humanities in a broadly appealing way."[28]

National Humanities Medal and Charles Frankel Prize[edit]

National Humanities Medal

The National Humanities Medal, inaugurated in 1997, honors individuals or groups whose work has deepened the nation's understanding of the humanities, broadened citizens' engagement with the humanities, or helped preserve and expand Americans' access to important resources in the humanities. Up to 12 medals can be awarded each year. From 1989 to 1996 the NEH awarded a similar prize known as the "Charles Frankel Prize.[29] The new award, a bronze medallion was designed by David Macaulay, the 1995 winner of the Frankel Prize. Lists of the winners of the National Humanities Medal[30] and the Frankel Prize[31] are available at the NEH website.

Humanities magazine[edit]

Starting in 1969, the NEH published a periodical called Humanities; that original incarnation was discontinued in 1978. In 1980, Humanities magazine was relaunched ("ISSN 0018-7526). It is published six times per year, with one cover article each year dedicated to profiling that year's Jefferson Lecturer. Most of its articles have some connection to NEH activities. The magazine's editor since 2007 has been journalist and author "David Skinner.[32] From 1990 until her death in 2007, Humanities was edited by Mary Lou Beatty (who had previously been a high-ranking editor at the "Washington Post).[33][34]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Visiting NEH". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "How NEH Got Its Start". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  3. ^ "President Obama Announces his Intent to Nominate Dr. William "Bro" Adams as Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities". Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  4. ^ "Obama nominates William 'Bro' Adams to be next head of National Endowment for the Humanities". Minneapolis Star Tribune. 10 April 2014. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  5. ^ "Adams Tapped by President Obama". Colby College. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  6. ^ "Senate confirms head of US Humanities Endowment". The Washington Post. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "Deputy Chair". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 25 February 2015. 
  8. ^ Robin Pogrebin, "Obama Names a Republican to Lead the Humanities Endowment", "New York Times, June 4, 2009.
  9. ^ Robin Pogrebin, "Rocco Landesman Confirmed as Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts", New York Times, August 7, 2009.
  10. ^ "E.J. Dionne Welcomes Jim Leach's Call for Civility". The Washington Post. 30 November 2009. Retrieved 3 November 2012. 
  11. ^ "St. Paul's atheists are coming out of the closet," Bob Shaw, St. Paul Pioneer Press, August 4, 2014. Retrieved August 5, 2014.
  12. ^ "National Council on the Humanities". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  13. ^ "Information about the Divisions and Offices that Administer NEH Grant Programs". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 11 April 2014. 
  14. ^ "About the Bridging Cultures Initiative". Retrieved 25 July 2014. 
  15. ^ "NEH Veterans Initiative". Retrieved 2 August 2014. 
  16. ^ "We the People". Retrieved 13 July 2014. 
  17. ^ "The Writings of Henry D. Thoreau". March 2, 2010. Archived from the original on 2010-03-02. 
  18. ^ "About We the People". Retrieved 15 May 2012. 
  19. ^ "King Tut Comes to America". Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  20. ^ "Ken Burns The Civil War". Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  21. ^ "Library of America". National Endowment for the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2017-01-12. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  22. ^ "Newspapers: The First Draft of History". National Endowment for the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  23. ^ "NEH & Books". Archived from the original on 2016-09-26. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  24. ^ "Edsitement". National Endowment for the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  25. ^ Myers, J. Wilson. "Eleanor Emlen Myers, 1925–1996" (PDF). Breaking Ground: Women in Old World Archaeology. Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 February 2015. Retrieved 20 February 2015. 
  26. ^ "Valley of the Shadow". National Endowment for the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  27. ^ "What's on the menu?". National Endowment for the Humanities. Archived from the original on 2017-01-24. Retrieved 2017-01-27. 
  28. ^ Jefferson Lecturers at NEH Website (retrieved January 22, 2009).
  29. ^ Awards and Honors at NEH Website (retrieved January 23, 2009).
  30. ^ National Humanities Medals Archived 2011-07-21 at the "Wayback Machine. at NEH Website (retrieved January 23, 2009).
  31. ^ Winners of the Charles Frankel Prize at NEH Website (retrieved January 23, 2009).
  32. ^ "Editor's Note, September/October 2007". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 2016-08-21. 
  33. ^ "Editor's Note, March/April 2007". National Endowment for the Humanities. Retrieved 2016-08-21. 
  34. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (2007-02-09). "Mary Lou Beatty; Editor at NEH, Post". The Washington Post. "ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-08-21. 

External links[edit]

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