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"Le Corbusier, 1922, Nature morte verticale (Vertical Still Life), oil on canvas, 146.3 cm × 89.3 cm (57.6 by 35.2 inches), "Kunstmuseum Basel

Purism, referring to the arts, was a movement that took place between 1918 and 1925 that influenced French painting and architecture. Purism was led by "Amédée Ozenfant and "Charles Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier). Ozenfant and Le Corbusier created a variation of the "Cubist movement and called it Purism: where objects are represented as elementary forms devoid of detail. The main concepts were presented in their book Après le Cubisme (After Cubism) published in 1918.[1][2]

Contents

Post World War I[edit]

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Le Corbusier, 1921, Nature morte (Still Life), oil on canvas, 54 x 81 cm, "Musée National d'Art Moderne

Le Corbusier and Ozenfant were the creators of Purism. "Fernand Léger was a principle associate.[2] Purism was an attempt to restore regularity in a war-torn France post World War I.[1] Unlike what they saw as 'decorative' fragmentation of objects in Cubism, Purism proposed a style of painting where elements were represented as robust simplified forms with minimal detail, while embracing technology and the machine.[2]

Purism culminated in Le Corbusier’s Pavillon de l'Esprit Nouveau (Pavilion of the New Spirit), constructed for the "International Exhibition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts in 1925. This included the work of Cubists "Juan Gris and "Jacques Lipchitz. Following this exhibition the relationship between Le Corbusier and Ozenfant declined.[2]

L'Esprit Nouveau[edit]

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L'Esprit Nouveau, No. 1, October 1920. Edited by Paul Dermée and Michel Seuphor, later by Charles-Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier) and Amédée Ozenfant. Published by Éditions de l'Esprit Nouveau, Paris
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Amédée Ozenfant, 1921, Nature morte au verre de vin rouge (Still Life with Glass of Red Wine), oil on canvas, 50.6 x 61.2 cm, "Kunstmuseum Basel

Ozenfant and Le Corbusier contributed extensively to an art magazine called L'Esprit Nouveau from 1920 to 1925 serving as a platform for propaganda towards their Purist movement.[1][3]

Purist Manifesto[edit]

The Purist Manifesto lays out the rules Ozenfant and Le Corbusier created to govern the Purist movement.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Ball, Susan (1981). Ozenfant and Purism: The Evolution of a Style 1915–1930. Ann Arbor, Michigan: UMI Research Press. p. 213. 
  2. ^ a b c d Purism, Tate
  3. ^ Eliel, Carol S. et al. (2001). L'Esprit Nouveau: Purism in Paris, 1918-1925. New York: Harry Abrams, Inc. "ISBN "0-8109-6727-8

External links[edit]

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