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Main article: "District of Columbia retrocession

In 1846, based on a petition to Congress by the residents of the Virginia portion of the District ("Alexandria County) and the City of Alexandria, the area of 31 square miles (80 km2) which was ceded by Virginia was returned,[28] leaving 69 square miles (179 km2) of territory originally ceded by Maryland as the current area of the District in its entirety.[29]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ellis, Joseph J., (2000) Founding Brothers, Vintage Books, New York, NY, p. 73
  2. ^ a b c d e f Reps 1965, pp. 240–242
  3. ^ Crew 1892, p. 66
  4. ^ See "List of capitals in the United States for a complete accounting.
  5. ^ Allen 2001, p. 4
  6. ^ Panchyk, Richard (July 1, 2016). Washington, DC, History for Kids: The Making of a Capital City, with 21 Activities. Chicago Review Press. "ISBN "978-1613730065. 
  7. ^ Whitfield, Perter; Speicher, Lara (October 10, 2005). Cities of the World: A History in Maps. University of California Press. p. 199. "ISBN "978-0520247253. 
  8. ^ Writers Web| 
  9. ^ Constitution of the United States, "United States Senate, retrieved 2008-12-12 
  10. ^ a b Ellis 2002, pp. 48–52
  11. ^ a b c d (1) "Residence Act". Web Guides: Primary Documents in American History. "Library of Congress. Retrieved 2017-04-23. 
    (2) ""An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States." [New York] F. Childs and J. Swaine, 1790.]". "Library of Congress. July 16, 1790. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
    (3) ""An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States." Statutes At Large, 1st Congress, Session II, Chapter 28, page 130, July 16, 1790". American Memory. "Library of Congress. Retrieved 2017-04-22. 
  12. ^ Elkins 1995, p. 160
  13. ^ Miller 2003, p. 251
  14. ^ The Senate Moves to Philadelphia, United States Senate, retrieved 2008-12-12 
  15. ^ Bowling 2000, pp. 3–4
  16. ^ Elkins 1995, p. 169
  17. ^ Elkins 1995, p. 174
  18. ^ (1) ".. An act to amend "An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States. [Philadelphia: Printed by Francis Childs and Johnn Swaine 1791.]". "Library of Congress. March 3, 1791. Retrieved April 22, 2017. 
    (2) "An act to amend "An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the government of the United States": Statutes At Large, 1st Congress, Session III, Chapter 17, pages 214-215, March 3, 1791". American Memory: A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation: U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774 - 1875. "Library of Congress. Retrieved April 22, 2017. 
  19. ^ Hazelton 1903, p. 4
  20. ^ Washington, George. John C. Fitzpatrick, ed. Proclamation: Georgetown, March 30, 1791. The Writings of George Washington from the Original Manuscript Sources: 1745-1799. 31: January 22, 1790—March 9, 1792. Washington: "United States Government Printing Office (August, 1939). Retrieved 2016-10-07 – via "Google Books. Now therefore for the purposes of amending and completing the location of the whole of the said territory of the ten miles square in conformity with the said amendatory act of Congress, I do hereby declare and make known that the whole of said territory shall be located and included within the four lines following, that is to say: Beginning at Jones's point, the upper cape of Hunting Creek in Virginia, and at an angle in the outset of 45 degrees west of the north: ... 
  21. ^ Allen 2001, p. 8
  22. ^ Allen 2001, pp. 13–15
  23. ^ Allen 2001, p. 19
  24. ^ Frary 1969, pp. 34–35
  25. ^ Frary 1969, pp. 44–45
  26. ^ Bowling 2005, p. 58
  27. ^ Carter II, Edward C. (1971–1972), "Benjamin Henry Latrobe and the Growth and Development of Washington, 1798-1818", Records of the Columbia Historical Society: 139 
  28. ^ "Washington, D.C. History F.A.Q.". Historical Society of Washington, D.C. Retrieved 2015-05-15. 
  29. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions About Washington, D.C". "Historical Society of Washington, D.C. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 

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