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Main article: "List of Speakers of the United States House of Representatives

Recent election results[edit]

List of Speaker of the United States House of Representatives elections

To be elected as Speaker, a candidate must receive an absolute majority of all votes cast for individuals, excluding those who abstain.[27]

January 2011[edit]

Source: Election of the Speaker Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. January 5, 2011.

Candidate Votes  %
√ "John Boehner (R) 242 55.6%
"Nancy Pelosi (D) 173 40.0%
"Heath Shuler (D) 11 2.5%
"John Lewis (D) 2 0.5%
"Dennis Cardoza (D) 1 0.2%
"Jim Costa (D) 1 0.2%
"Jim Cooper (D) 1 0.2%
"Steny Hoyer (D) 1 0.2%
"Marcy Kaptur (D) 1 0.2%
Total 433 100.0%
""Present" 1 0.2%
Not voting 1 0.2%

January 2013[edit]

Source: Election of the Speaker Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. January 3, 2013.

Candidate Votes  %
√ "John Boehner (R) 220 50.8%
"Nancy Pelosi (D) 192 44.3%
"Eric Cantor (R) 3 0.7%
"Jim Cooper (D) 2 0.5%
"Allen West (R)[a] 2 0.5%
"Justin Amash (R) 1 0.2%
"John Dingell (D) 1 0.2%
"Jim Jordan (R) 1 0.2%
"Raul Labrador (R) 1 0.2%
"John Lewis (D) 1 0.2%
"Colin Powell (R)[a] 1 0.2%
"David Walker (R)[a] 1 0.2%
Total 426 100.0%
""Present" 1 0.2%
Not voting 6 1.4%
Vacant 2 0.5%

January 2015[edit]

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives election, January 2015

Source: Election of the Speaker Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives. January 6, 2015.

Candidate Votes  %
√ "John Boehner (R) 216 52.9%
"Nancy Pelosi (D) 164 40.2%
"Dan Webster (R) 12 2.9%
"Louie Gohmert (R) 3 0.7%
"Ted Yoho (R) 2 0.5%
"Jim Jordan (R) 2 0.5%
"Jeff Duncan (R) 1 0.2%
"Rand Paul (R)[a] 1 0.2%
"Colin Powell (R)[a] 1 0.2%
"Trey Gowdy (R) 1 0.2%
"Kevin McCarthy (R) 1 0.2%
"Jim Cooper (D) 1 0.2%
"Peter DeFazio (D) 1 0.2%
"Jeff Sessions (R)[a] 1 0.2%
"John Lewis (D) 1 0.2%
Total 408 100.0%
""Present" 1 0.2%
Not voting 25 5.7%
Vacant 1 0.2%

October 2015[edit]

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives election, October 2015

On September 25, 2015, "Speaker Boehner formally announced to the "Republican "congressional caucus of his intention to resign from the House on October 30, 2015, which necessitated an election for a new speaker before that time.[28] The election was held on October 29.[29]

Candidate Votes  %
√ "Paul Ryan (R) 236 54.3%
"Nancy Pelosi (D) 184 42.3%
"Dan Webster (R) 9 2.0%
"Colin Powell (R)[a] 1 0.2%
"Jim Cooper (D) 1 0.2%
"John Lewis (D) 1 0.2%
Total 432
Not voting 3
Vacant 0

January 2017[edit]

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives election, 2017
Candidate Votes  %
√ "Paul Ryan (R) 239 55.2%
"Nancy Pelosi (D) 189 43.6%
"Tim Ryan (D) 2 0.5%
"Jim Cooper (D) 1 0.2%
"John Lewis (D) 1 0.2%
"Dan Webster (R) 1 0.2%
Total 433
Not voting 2
Vacant 0

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Beth, Richard S.; Heitshusen, Valerie (January 4, 2013). "Speakers of the House: Elections, 1913–2013" (PDF). "Congressional Research Service. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  • Garraty, John, ed. American National Biography (1999) 20 volumes; contains scholarly biographies of all Speakers no longer alive.
  • Green, Matthew N. The Speaker of the House: A Study of Leadership (Yale University Press; 2010) 292 pages; Examines partisan pressures and other factors that shaped the leadership of the speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives; focuses on the period since 1940.
  • Grossman, Mark. Speakers of the House of Representatives (Amenia, NY: Grey House Publishing, 2009). The comprehensive work on the subject, covering, in depth, the lives of the Speakers from Frederick Muhlenberg to Nancy Pelosi.
  • Remini, Robert V. The House: the History of the House of Representatives (Smithsonian Books, 2006). The standard scholarly history.
  • Rohde, David W. Parties and Leaders in the Postreform House (1991).
  • Smock, Raymond W., and Susan W. Hammond, eds. Masters of the House: Congressional Leadership Over Two Centuries (1998). Short biographies of key leaders.
  • Zelizer. Julian E. ed. The American Congress: The Building of Democracy (2004). A comprehensive history by 40 scholars.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Not a sitting member of the House of Representatives.

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/3/19
  2. ^ Brudnick, Ida A. (January 4, 2012). "Congressional Salaries and Allowances" (PDF). CRS Report for Congress. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved December 2, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives". Clerk.house.gov. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  4. ^ See the "United States Presidential Line of Succession statute, "3 U.S.C. § 19
  5. ^ a b http://fpc.state.gov/documents/organization/202873.pdf
  6. ^ Ripley, Party Leaders in the House of Representatives, pp. 98-99.
  7. ^ "Muhlenberg, Frederick Augustus Conrad" http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=M001063 .
  8. ^ Oswald Seidensticker, "Frederick Augustus Conrad Muhlenberg, Speaker of the House of Representatives, in the First Congress, 1789," Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Vol. 13, No. 2 (Jul. 1889), pp. 184-206 in JSTOR
  9. ^ C Stewart III, Architect or tactician? Henry Clay and the institutional development of the US House of Representatives" 1998, online
  10. ^ Robinson, William A. "Thomas B. Reed, Parliamentarian". The American Historical Review, October 1931. pp. 137–138.
  11. ^ Oleszek, Walter J. (December 1998). "A Pre-Twentieth Century Look at the House Committee on Rules". U.S. House of Representatives. Retrieved July 5, 2007. 
  12. ^ Charles O. Jones, "Joseph G. Cannon and Howard W. Smith: An Essay on the Limits of Leadership in the House of Representatives," Journal of Politics (1968), 30: 617-646 "doi:10.2307/2128798
  13. ^ "Sam Rayburn House Museum". Texas Historical Commission. Archived from the original on July 1, 2007. Retrieved July 5, 2007. 
  14. ^ See "Party Divisions of United States Congresses
  15. ^ a b Condon, Stephanie (August 6, 2010). "GOP to Launch "Fire Pelosi" Bus Tour". CBS News. Retrieved February 11, 2011. 
  16. ^ a b Sanchez, Ray (November 3, 2010). "Nancy Pelosi: House Speaker's Exclusive Interview With Diane Sawyer – ABC News". Abcnews.go.com. Retrieved December 6, 2011. 
  17. ^ Allan Nevins. Ordeal of the Union, Volume II: A House Dividing 1852–1857 (New York, 1947), 413-415.
  18. ^ Allan Nevins. The Emergence of Lincoln, Volume II: Prologue to Civil War, 1859–1861 (New York, 1950), 116-123.
  19. ^ "Bush, George W. (January 23, 2007). "President Bush Delivers State of the Union Address". "The White House. Retrieved August 26, 2007. 
  20. ^ San Francisco Commission on the Status of Women. City & County of San Francisco, November 16, 2006. Retrieved on July 5, 2007.
  21. ^ "Nancy Pelosi steeled White House for health push – Carrie Budoff Brown and Glenn Thrush". Politico.Com. Retrieved December 6, 2011. 
  22. ^ Hurst, Steven R. (January 5, 2011). "Republicans take charge of US House, poised for clashes with Obama over spending, health care". 1310 News. Retrieved January 7, 2011. 
  23. ^ Speaker of the House Law & Legal Definition. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  24. ^ Speaker Pro Tempore Law & Legal Definition. Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  25. ^ "Rules of the House of Representatives" (PDF). January 6, 2015. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  26. ^ [Americapedia: Taking the Dumb Out of Freedom Jodi Lynn Anderson, Daniel Ehrenhaft & Andisheh Nouraee] 2011, "Bloomsbury Publishing Page 26.
  27. ^ Heitshusen, Valerie (October 23, 2015). "Electing the Speaker of the House of Representatives: Frequently Asked Questions" (PDF). Congressional Research Service. p. 2. 
  28. ^ Shesgreen, Deirdre; Allen, Cooper (September 25, 2015). "Speaker John Boehner to resign from Congress". USA Today. 
  29. ^ "FINAL VOTE RESULTS FOR ROLL CALL 581". Clerk of US House of Representatives. October 29, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 

External links[edit]

  • "Speaker of the House of Representatives". Retrieved 30 October 2016.  Official Website, Information about role as party leader, powers as presiding officer.
  • "Capitol Questions." C-SPAN (2003). Notable elections and role.
  • The Cannon Centenary Conference: The Changing Nature of the Speakership. (2003). House Document 108-204. History, nature and role of the Speakership.
  • Congressional Quarterly's Guide to Congress, 5th ed. (2000). Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press.
  • "Wilson, Woodrow. (1885). Congressional Government. New York: Houghton Mifflin.
"United States presidential line of succession
Preceded by
"Vice President
"Mike Pence
2nd in line Succeeded by
"President pro tempore of the Senate
"Orrin Hatch
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