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T
T t
("See below)
""Writing cursive forms of T
Usage
Writing system "Latin script
Type "Alphabetic and "Logographic
Language of origin "Latin language
Phonetic usage ["t]
["]
["]
["d]
["]
["t͡ʃ]
"/t/
Unicode value U+0054, U+0074
Alphabetical position 20
History
Development
Z9
Time period ~-700 to present
Descendants  • "Th (digraph)
 • "
 • "
 • "
 • "Ŧ
 • "Ť
 • "Ţ
 • "
Sisters "𐍄
"Т
"Ҭ
"Ћ
"Ҵ
"ת
ت
ܬ

"ة
"
"𐎚
"𐎙
"
Տ տ
Ց ց
"
"
"
"
Variations ("See below)
Other
Other letters commonly used with "t(x), "th, "tzsch


T ("named tee "/t/[1]) is the 20th "letter in the "modern English "alphabet and the "ISO basic Latin alphabet. It is the most commonly used "consonant and the second most common letter in "English-language texts.[2]

Contents

History[edit]

Phoenician
"Taw
Etruscan
T
Greek
"Tau
""Proto-semiticT-01.svg ""EtruscanT-01.svg ""Tau uc lc.svg

"Taw was the last letter of the Western "Semitic and "Hebrew alphabets. The sound value of Semitic Taw, "Greek alphabet Tαυ (Tau), "Old Italic and Latin T has remained fairly constant, representing ["t] in each of these; and it has also kept its original basic shape in most of these alphabets.

Use in writing systems[edit]

English[edit]

In English, ⟨t⟩ usually denotes the "voiceless alveolar plosive ("International Phonetic Alphabet and "X-SAMPA: /"t/), as in tart, tee, or ties, often with "aspiration at the beginnings of words or before "stressed vowels.

The digraph ⟨ti⟩ often corresponds to the sound /ʃ/ (a "voiceless palato-alveolar sibilant) word-medially when followed by a vowel, as in nation, ratio, negotiation, and Croatia.

The letter ⟨t⟩ corresponds to the affricate /t͡ʃ/ in some words as a result of "yod-coalescence (for example, in words ending in "-ture", such as future).

A common "digraph is ⟨th⟩, which usually represents a "dental fricative, but occasionally represents /t/ (as in Thomas and thyme.)

Other languages[edit]

In the "orthographies of other languages, ⟨t⟩ is often used for /t/, the "voiceless dental plosive /t̪/ or similar sounds.

Other systems[edit]

In the "International Phonetic Alphabet, ⟨t⟩ denotes the "voiceless alveolar plosive.

Related characters[edit]

Descendants and related characters in the Latin alphabet[edit]

Ancestors and siblings in other alphabets[edit]

Derived signs, symbols and abbreviations[edit]

Computing codes[edit]

Character T t
Unicode name LATIN CAPITAL LETTER T     LATIN SMALL LETTER T
Encodings decimal hex decimal hex
"Unicode 84 U+0054 116 U+0074
"UTF-8 84 54 116 74
"Numeric character reference T T t t
"EBCDIC family 227 E3 163 A3
"ASCII 1 84 54 116 74
1 Also for encodings based on ASCII, including the DOS, Windows, ISO-8859 and Macintosh families of encodings.

Other representations[edit]

"NATO phonetic "Morse code
Tango
""ICS Tango.svg ""Semaphore Tango.svg ""Sign language T.svg ""⠞
"Signal flag "Flag semaphore "American manual alphabet ("ASL "fingerspelling) "Braille
"dots-2345

References[edit]

  1. ^ "T", Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition (1989); Merriam-Webster's Third New International Dictionary of the English Language, Unabridged (1993); "tee", op. cit.
  2. ^ Lewand, Robert. "Relative Frequencies of Letters in General English Plain text". Cryptographical Mathematics. "Central College. Archived from the original on 2008-07-08. Retrieved 2008-06-25. 
  3. ^ Constable, Peter (2003-09-30). "L2/03-174R2: Proposal to Encode Phonetic Symbols with Middle Tilde in the UCS" (PDF). 
  4. ^ Constable, Peter (2004-04-19). "L2/04-132 Proposal to add additional phonetic characters to the UCS" (PDF). 
  5. ^ Everson, Michael (2006-08-06). "L2/06-266: Proposal to add Latin letters and a Greek symbol to the UCS" (PDF). 
  6. ^ "Everson, Michael; et al. (2002-03-20). "L2/02-141: Uralic Phonetic Alphabet characters for the UCS" (PDF). 
  7. ^ Ruppel, Klaas; Aalto, Tero; Everson, Michael (2009-01-27). "L2/09-028: Proposal to encode additional characters for the Uralic Phonetic Alphabet" (PDF). 
  8. ^ Cook, Richard; Everson, Michael (2001-09-20). "L2/01-347: Proposal to add six phonetic characters to the UCS" (PDF). 
  9. ^ Everson, Michael; Jacquerye, Denis; "Lilley, Chris (2012-07-26). "L2/12-270: Proposal for the addition of ten Latin characters to the UCS" (PDF). 

External links[edit]

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