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Andrew W. Mellon Collection, "National Gallery of Art, "Washington, D.C.
The Washington Family by "Edward Savage (1789–1796).
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"The British Museum, "London (2011)
1798 "stipple print of The Washington Family by Edward Savage

The Washington Family by "Edward Savage is a life-sized group "portrait of "U.S. President "George Washington, First Lady "Martha Washington, two of her grandchildren and a servant or "slave.[1][2] Based on life studies made early in Washington's presidency, Savage began work on the "oil painting in "New York City during 1789–1790 and later completed it in "Philadelphia during 1795–1796.[3] The "National Gallery of Art in "Washington, D.C., presently displays the large painting (7 feet (2.1 m) x 9.3 feet (2.8 m)).[4]

The image was a famous one in the 19th century. Prints were mass-produced by Savage beginning in 1798, and by "John Sartain in 1840.[5] Washington himself ordered four prints of Savage's "engraving, hanging one in the family dining room at "Mount Vernon.[6][7] The "Library of Congress holds in its collections a print of a color engraving that Savage and Robert Wilkinson published in London in 1798.[8]

The northerly direction to the left to which a "magnetic compass on the base of a globe points and topographical details of the view indicate that the family is on the west bank of the "Potomac River at "Mount Vernon, occupying an idealized rendering of the "portico that Washington designed for the house.[1] Shown are Martha's grandson "George Washington Parke Custis (called "Wash" or "Washy"), George Washington, Martha's granddaughter "Eleanor Parke Custis (called "Nelly"), Martha and a black servant of uncertain identity (perhaps the enslaved "Christopher Sheels, "William (Billy) Lee or Austin).[1][7][9]

With a "plan of the future city of "Washington[10] in front of her, Martha Washington is, according to Savage's catalogue, "pointing with her fan to the grand avenue".[1][7] Some descriptions of the painting state that the "grand avenue" is "Pennsylvania Avenue.[1][4] However, the "grand avenue" that the city plan illustrates has actually become the "National Mall (see: "L'Enfant Plan).[11]

Holding a "caliper, young George's right hand rests near the top of the globe, which lacks geographical markings. A museum's description interprets this portion of the scene as representing American hopes for rising global significance.[12]

A researcher has found that the "perspective of the painting terminates at George Washington's heart.[13]

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"National Heritage Museum, "Lexington, Massachusetts (2009)
A Vision Unfolds by Peter Waddell (2005)

An oil painting by Peter Waddell entitled A Vision Unfolds debuted in 2005 within an exhibition on "Freemasonry that the "Octagon House's museum in Washington, D.C., was hosting. The painting was again displayed in 2007, 2009, 2010 and 2011, first in the "Joslyn Art Museum in "Omaha, Nebraska and later in the "National Heritage Museum in "Lexington, Massachusetts and in the Scottish Rite Center of the District of Columbia in Washington, D.C. Containing elements present in The Washington Family, Waddell's "history painting depicts a meeting that is taking place within an elaborate surveying tent. In the imaginary scene, African American surveyor-astronomer "Benjamin Banneker presents a map of the Territory of Columbia (see: "Founding of Washington, D.C.) to President Washington and surveyor "Andrew Ellicott.[14]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Manca, Joseph (Fall 2011). "A Theology of Architecture: Edward Savage's Portrait of George Washington and his Family". Source: Notes in the History of Art. "Chicago: The "University of Chicago Press Journals. 31 (1): 39–36. "JSTOR 23208548. "doi:10.1086/sou.31.1.23208548. Retrieved 2017-08-28. 
  2. ^ Howard, Hugh (2009). Chapter 7: "The Washington Family". The Painter's Chair: George Washington and the Making of American Art. New York: "Bloomsbury Press. pp. 138–156. "ISBN "9781596912441. "LCCN 2008028228. "OCLC 233591858. Retrieved 2017-08-28 – via "Google Books. 
  3. ^ Savage lived in London, 1791–94, and did not resume work on the painting until after his return to the United States.
  4. ^ a b "Savage, Edward. "The Washington Family 1789-1796". Washington, D.C.: "National Gallery of Art. Retrieved 2016-10-24.  Archived 2016-09-14 at the "Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ "The Washington Family". "The New York Times. 1892-12-30. 
  6. ^ (1) "Edward Savage". Digital Encyclopedia. "Mount Vernon, Virginia: George Washington's Mount Vernon. 2017. Retrieved 2017-08-28. Upon his return to the United States in 1794, Savage married Sarah Seaver, completed his group portrait of the Washingtons, and immediately set to work exhibiting and engraving the large-scale painting. Washington himself ordered four copies, hanging one in the family dining room at Mount Vernon.  Archived 2017-08-28 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (2) "Edward Savage, The Washington Family, engraving after the original, c. 1789-1790". Martha Washington: A Life. Edward Savage’s iconic portrait of the Washington Family was originally painted c. 1789-1790. George Washington purchased two engravings of the painting to display at Mount Vernon (one of which is pictured here)  Archived 2017-08-30 at the "Wayback Machine. Full size image of engraving
  7. ^ a b c "Description". The Washington Family. "Winston-Salem, North Carolina: "Reynolda House Museum of American Art, "Wake Forest University. Retrieved 2017-08-28.  Archived 2017-08-28 at the "Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ "The Washington family — George Washington, his lady, and her two grandchildren by the name of Custis / painted & engraved by E. Savage". "Library of Congress. 1798. Retrieved 2017-08-28. Summary: George Washington, Martha Washington, and her two grandchildren, around table on which there is a map, and an African American servant, William Lee, in background.  Archived 2017-08-28 at the "Wayback Machine. Full size image of engraving
  9. ^ "Enslaved Persons of African Descent in the President's House". The President's House in Philadelphia. "Philadelphia, "Pennsylvania: "Independence Hall Association (US history.org). 2017. Retrieved 2017-08-28.  Archived 2017-08-28 at the "Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ L'Enfant, Peter Charles; "Library of Congress (1991). "Plan of the city intended for the permanent seat of the government of t[he] United States: projected agreeable to the direction of the President of the United States, in pursuance of an act of Congress, passed on the sixteenth day of July, MDCCXC, "establishing the permanent seat on the bank of the Potowmac"". Facsimile: Computer-assisted reproduction of Pierre Charles L'Enfant's 1791 manuscript plan for the city of Washington, produced by the U.S. Geological Survey for the Library of Congress. Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress. "LCCN 97683585. Retrieved 2017-03-05. Published by the Library of Congress in 1991 with support from the National Geographic Society, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the National Park Service.  In Repository of the "Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, Washington, D.C.
  11. ^ (1) Pfanz, Donald C. (1981-02-11). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: National Mall" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved 2010-03-17. 
    (2) Hanlon, Mary. "The Mall: The Grand Avenue, The Government, and The People". University of Virginia. Retrieved 2010-05-05. 
    (3) "The 1791 L'Enfant Plan and the Mall". National Mall History. National Mall Coalition. 2015. Retrieved 2017-03-06. L’Enfant planned the Mall as a 400-foot wide Grand Avenue (shown in green in the plan at right), extending from the Capitol westward to the Washington Monument (marked “A” in the plan) at the banks of the Potomac River where it intersected the White House axis (marked “President’s House” in the plan)  Archived 2015-10-01 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (4) "Map 1: The L'Enfant Plan for Washington". "National Park Service. Retrieved 2009-10-27.  Archived 2009-01-21 at the "Wayback Machine. Note: L'Enfant's key to the federal city's plan states that "H" is the "Grand Avenue, 400 feet in breadth, and about a mile in length, ....". This feature is now the "National Mall.
    (5) Glazer, Nathan; Field, Cynthia R., eds. (2008). A Chronology of the Mall. The National Mall: Rethinking Washington’s Monumental Core. Baltimore, Maryland: "The Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 179. "ISBN "978-0-8018-8805-2. "OCLC 166273738. Retrieved 2015-01-02 – via "Google Books. 
  12. ^ "Description". The Washington Family. "Winston-Salem, North Carolina: "Reynolda House Museum of American Art, "Wake Forest University. Retrieved 2017-08-28. The boy stands to his right, dressed in a fine suit with a wide starched collar. His hand rests on a globe, representing American hopes for rising global significance.  Archived 2017-08-28 at the "Wayback Machine.
  13. ^ George Washington Inn (2009-03-11). "The Washington Family". "Mount Vernon, Virginia: George Washington Inn and Estate. Retrieved 2017-08-30.  Archived 2017-08-30 at the "Wayback Machine.
  14. ^ (1) "A Vision Unfolds". Exhibitions: The Initiated Eye: Secrets, Symbols, Freemasonry and the Architecture of Washington, DC. Peter Waddell.com. Retrieved 2016-10-22. A Vision Unfolds: 36" × 48", oil on canvas  Archived 2012-01-09 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (2) "Biography". Peter Waddell. Peter Waddell.com. Retrieved 2016-10-22. Exhibitions: ... 2005: The Initiated Eye: Secrets, Symbols, Freemasonry and the Architecture of Washington DC. The Octagon Museum, Washington, DC.  Archived 2012-01-09 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (3) "Masonic Art Exhibit Opens at the Octagon". The Scottish Rite Journal of Freemasonry: Southern Jurisdiction, U.S.A.: Current Interest: July-August 2005. Washington, D.C. Retrieved 2016-10-23. Tuesday, May 17, was the grand opening of the Octagon Museum’s phenomenal exhibit, "The Initiated Eye: Secrets, Symbols, Freemasonry, and the Architecture of Washington, D.C." Twenty-one paintings by Peter Waddell showcased the little-recognized contribution of Freemasons to the design and architecture of our nation's capital. 
    (4) "The Initiated Eye: Secrets, Symbols, Freemasonry and the Architecture of Washington, DC". ArtMagick. 2007. Retrieved 2016-12-02. The Initiated Eye: Secrets, Symbols, Freemasonry and the Architecture of Washington, DC, with Paintings by Peter Waddell, features 21 paintings by Waddell, a contemporary history painter, illustrates the Masonic connection to the building of early-19th century Washington. Exhibition Locations and Dates: USA, Nebraska, Omaha, Joslyn Art Museum: April 28, 2007 - June 10, 2007  Archived 2007-10-05 at the "Wayback Machine.|
    (5) "Benjamin Banneker". The Initiated Eye: Freemasonry and the Architecture of Washington, D.C. (exhibition). "Lexington, Massachusetts: "National Heritage Museum. 2009-12-17. Retrieved 2016-10-22. The Initiated Eye" presents 21 oil paintings by Peter Waddell based on the architecture of Washington, D.C., and the role that our founding fathers and prominent citizens – many of whom were Freemasons – played in establishing the layout and design of the city. ... The painting shown here depicts a meeting between President George Washington (1732–1799) and surveyors Andrew Ellicott (1754–1820) and Benjamin Banneker (1731–1806). Congress designated the location of the new capital on January 24, 1791. Elliott and Banneker surveyed the ten-mile-square tract of land and produced a base map of the area. ... The Initiated Eye" opens December 19, 2009 and will be on view through January 9, 2011.  Archived 2010-02-26 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (6) "A Vision Unfolds". The Initiated Eye: Panel 1. Washington, D.C.: The Grand Lodge of Free And Accepted Masons of the District of Columbia. 2013. Retrieved 2016-12-02. A Vision Unfolds - Congress designated the location of the new Capitol on January 24, 1791. It was a ten-mile square parcel of land along the Potomac and Eastern Branch Rivers. Andrew Ellicott and Benjamin Banneker surveyed the tract of land and produced the base map. Banneker, a self taught African American surveyor and astronomer, plotted the locations of the forty boundary stones one mile apart along the entire perimeter.  Archived 2016-10-23 at the "Wayback Machine. Note: Panel 1 contains a high-resolution image of A Vision Unfolds.
    (7) "Grand Lodge History & The Initiated Eye Painting Exhibit". Washington, D.C.: The Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the District of Columbia. 2011-10-26. Retrieved 2016-10-23. Illustrious Leonard Proden, 33˚, S.G.I.G. of the Supreme Council in D.C and Past Grand Master of Masons in D.C is pleased to announce that the Valley of Washington, Orient of the District of Columbia, will celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the founding of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of the District of Columbia on Tuesday, November 15, 2011. All brethren, their family, and friends are invited to participate in this festive evening which will include: ... A special viewing of "The Initiated Eye", the heralded collection of D.C. Masonic-themed paintings, on exhibition in Washington, D.C. again for the first time in over five years. The artist, Peter Waddell, will be on hand to present his latest addition to the collection, a celebratory painting commemorating the Bicentennial of the Grand Lodge of D.C.  Archived 2016-10-23 at the "Wayback Machine.
    (8) Ellicott, Andrew (1793). "Territory of Columbia". Maps. "Library of Congress. Retrieved 2016-10-22. Notes: ... Accompanied by positive and negative photocopies of 3 letters dated 1793 relating to the map, 1 of which signed by: And'w Ellicott.  Archived 2016-10-11 at the "Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]

National Gallery of Art (2014-05-30). "The Washington Family, 1789–1796, Edward Savage" (video). Retrieved 2017-08-30 – via "You Tube. 

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