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( => ( => ( => United States Senate elections, 2010 [pageid] => 1134236 ) =>
United States Senate elections, 2010
"United States
← "2008 November 2, 2010
Numbers below reflect only the 2010 general elections.
"2012/13 →

34 of the 100 seats of the "U.S. Senate
(and 6 special elections)

51 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  ""Harry Reid official portrait 2009.jpg ""Sen Mitch McConnell official.jpg
Leader "Harry Reid "Mitch McConnell
Party "Democratic "Republican
Leader's seat "Nevada "Kentucky
Seats before 57 41
Seats after 51 47
Seat change Decrease 6 Increase 6
Popular vote 29,110,733[1] 32,680,704
Percentage 44.0% 49.4%
Swing Decrease 7.9% Increase 4.9%
Seats up 19 18
Races won 13 24

  Third party
 
Party "Independent
Seats before 2[Note 1]
Seats after 2[Note 2]
Seat change Steady
Popular vote 147,645
Percentage 0.22%
Seats up 0
Races won 0

""2010 Senate election results map.svg
Results of the November elections
     Democratic gain      Republican gain
     Democratic hold      Republican hold

"Majority Leader before election

"Harry Reid
"Democratic

Elected "Majority Leader

"Harry Reid
"Democratic

Elections to the United States Senate were held November 2, 2010 from among the "United States Senate's 100 seats. A special election was held January 19, 2010 for a "mid-term vacancy in Massachusetts. Thirty-four of the November elections were for six-year terms to the "Senate's Class 3, while other three were special elections to finish incomplete terms. Those 37 November elections featured 19 incumbent Democrats (7 of whom retired or were defeated in the primary) and 18 incumbent Republicans (eight of whom retired or were defeated in the primary).

After the "previous elections (in 2008), the Senate was composed of 58 "Democrats, 40 "Republicans, and 2 "independents who caucused with the Democrats.

Republicans won four seats held by retiring Democrats and Republicans defeated two incumbent Democrats, for a Republican net gain of six seats. This was the largest number of Republican net gains since the "1994 elections and also the first time since that election that Republicans successfully defended all of their own seats. This was the fourth consecutive election of Class 3 senators where Democrats failed to gain seats and the third consecutive mid-term election held in a president's first term where Republicans picked up seats.

Despite Republican gains, the Democrats retained a majority of the Senate with 51 seats plus 2 independents who caucused with them, compared to the 47 Republican seats.

Contents

Results summary[edit]

51 2 47
Democratic Independent Republican

Shading indicates party with largest share of that line.

Parties Total
"Democratic "Republican Independent "Libertarian "Green "Constitution Others
Before these elections 57 41 2ID 100
Not Up Total 38 23 2ID 63
Class 1 (2006→2012) 22 9 2ID 33
Class 2 (2008→2014) 19A 15 34
Up Total 19 18 37
Class 1 Appointees 2 2
Class 2 Appointees 1 1
Class 3 Appointees 2 2
Class 3 16 18 34
Incumbent
retired
Total 6 6 12
Held by same party 3 6 9
Replaced by other party Decrease 3 Democrats replaced by Increase 3 Republicans IncreaseDecrease 6
Result 3 9 12
Incumbent
ran
Total 13A 12 25
Renominated and won re-election 8A 10 20
Renominated but lost re-election Decrease 2 Democrats replaced by Increase 2 Republicans IncreaseDecrease 2
Lost renomination but won re-election 1 1
Lost renomination but party held 1 1
Lost renomination and party lost Decrease 1 Democrat replaced by Increase 1 Republican IncreaseDecrease 1
Result 10A 15 25
Total held 13A 18 31
Net gain/loss Decrease 6 Increase 6 IncreaseDecrease 6
Total elected 13A 24 37
Nationwide vote Votes 29,110,733 32,680,704 147,645 755,812 516,517 172,435 2,807,291 66,191,137
Share 43.98% 49.37% 0.22% 1.14% 0.78% 0.26% 4.24% 100%
Result 51 47 2ID 100
End of "this Congress 56 42 2ID 100

A Includes two incumbent appointees who won elections to finish their term or to the next full term.

ID The two Independents joined with the Democrats in their caucus.

Source: The Green Papers 2010 U.S. Senate Popular Vote and FEC Total Receipts by Party

Change in Senate composition[edit]

After the January special election[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48 D49 D50
Majority → D51
R41
Gain
I2 I1 D57 D56 D55 D54 D53 D52
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

Before the elections[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42
Ran
D43
Ran
D44
Ran
D45
Ran
D46
Ran
D47
Ran
D48
Ran
D49
Ran
D50
Ran
Majority → D51
Ran
R41
Retired
I2 I1 D57
Retired
D56
Retired
D55
Retired
D54
Retired
D53
Ran
D52
Ran
R40
Retired
R39
Retired
R38
Retired
R37
Retired
R36
Retired
R35
Ran
R34
Ran
R33
Ran
R32
Ran
R31
Ran
R21 R22 R23
Ran
R24
Ran
R25
Ran
R26
Ran
R27
Ran
R28
Ran
R29
Ran
R30
Ran
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the general elections[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42
Re-elected
D43
Re-elected
D44
Re-elected
D45
Re-elected
D46
Re-elected
D47
Re-elected
D48
Re-elected
D49
Re-elected
D50
Hold
Majority → D51
Ran
R41
Hold
R42
Gain
R43
Gain
R44
Gain
R45
Gain
R46
Gain
R47
Gain
I2 I1
R40
Hold
R39
Hold
R38
Hold
R37
Hold
R36
Hold
R35
Hold
R34
Re-elected
R33
Re-elected
R32
Re-elected
R31
Re-elected
R21 R22 R23
Re-elected
R24
Re-elected
R25
Re-elected
R26
Re-elected
R27
Re-elected
R28
Re-elected
R29
Re-elected
R30
Re-elected
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the November special elections[edit]

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40 D39 D38 D37 D36 D35 D34 D33 D32 D31
D41 D42 D43 D44 D45 D46 D47 D48 D49
Appointee elected
D50
Hold
Majority → D51
Hold
R41 R42 R43 R44 R45 R46 R47
Gain, same as general
I2 I1
R40 R39 R38 R37 R36 R35 R34 R33 R32 R31
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# "Democratic
I# "Independent
R# "Republican

Gains and losses[edit]

""
""
Senate composition as a result of the 2010 elections.
""
""
Vote by county (click image for more details)

Retiring senators[edit]

Twelve incumbents chose not to run for re-election.

Democrats (6) Republicans (6)

Incumbents seeking re-election[edit]

Twenty-five incumbents sought re-election.

Democrats (13) Republicans (12)

Of the seats with retiring Democrats, three seats were kept by Democrats, and three were won by Republicans.

Of the seats with Democratic incumbents running for re-election, eight Democrats were re-elected, one appointee was elected to finish her term, and one appointee was elected to the next full term. Two lost re-election. One lost renomination and his seat was subsequently won by a Republican.

Of the seats with retiring Republicans, all six were replaced by Republicans.

Of the seats with Republicans incumbents running for re-election, eleven Republicans won re-election. One Republican lost renomination, but the seat was re-elected as a write-in.

Race summary[edit]

Special elections during the 111th Congress[edit]

In these special elections, the winner was seated during 2010 or before January 3, 2011, sorted by election date, then state, then class.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Massachusetts
(Class 1)
Kirk, Paul G."Paul G. Kirk Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee retired.
New senator "elected January 19, 2010.
Republican gain.
√ "Scott Brown (Republican) 51.9%
"Martha Coakley (Democratic) 47.1%
Joseph L. Kennedy ("Libertarian) 1.0%
Delaware
(Class 2)
Kaufman, Ted"Ted Kaufman Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee retired.
New senator "elected November 2, 2010.
Democratic hold.
√ "Chris Coons (Democratic) 56.6%
"Christine O'Donnell (Republican) 40.0%
Glenn Miller (Independent) 2.7%
James Rash (Libertarian) 0.7%
Illinois
(Class 3)
Burris, Roland"Roland Burris Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee retired.
New senator "elected November 2, 2010.
Winner also elected to next term, see below.
Republican gain.
√ "Mark Kirk (Republican) 48.2%
"Alexi Giannoulias (Democratic) 46.3%
"LeAlan Jones (Green) 3.2%
Mike Labino (Libertarian) 2.4%
New York
(Class 1)
Gillibrand, Kirsten"Kirsten Gillibrand Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee "elected November 2, 2010. √ "Kirsten Gillibrand (Democratic) 62.0%
"Joseph DioGuardi (Republican) 35.8%
Cecile Lawrence (Green) 0.8
Joseph Huff (Independent) 0.5%
West Virginia
(Class 1)
Goodwin, Carte"Carte Goodwin Democratic 2010 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee retired.
New senator "elected November 2, 2010.
Democratic hold.
√ "Joe Manchin (Democratic) 53.5%
"John Raese (Republican) 43.4%
"Jesse Johnson (Mountain) 1.9%
Jeff Becker (Constitution) 1.2%

Elections leading to the next Congress[edit]

Source: "Election 2010". The New York Times. Retrieved December 12, 2017. 

In these general elections, the winners were elected for the term beginning January 3, 2011; ordered by state.

All of the elections involved the Class 3 seats.

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history
Alabama Shelby, Richard"Richard Shelby Republican "1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Richard Shelby (Republican) 65.3%
William G. Barnes (Democratic) 34.7%
Alaska Murkowski, Lisa"Lisa Murkowski Republican 2002 (Appointed)
"2004
"2010
Incumbent lost renomination.
Incumbent "re-elected as "write-in candidate.
√ "Lisa Murkowski (Republican) 39.5%
"Joe Miller (Republican) 35.5%
"Scott McAdams (Democratic) 23.5%
Arizona McCain, John"John McCain Republican "1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "John McCain (Republican) 59.2%
"Rodney Glassman (Democratic) 34.7%
David Nolan (Libertarian) 4.7%
Jerry Joslyn (Green) 1.4%
Arkansas Lincoln, Blanche"Blanche Lincoln "Democratic "1998
"2004
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator "elected.
Republican gain.
√ "John Boozman (Republican) 58.0%
"Blanche Lincoln (Democratic) 36.9%
Trevor Drown (Independent) 3.3%
John Gray (Green) 1.9%
California Boxer, Barbara"Barbara Boxer "Democratic "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Barbara Boxer (Democratic) 52.1%
"Carly Fiorina (Republican) 42.5%
Gail Lightfoot (Libertarian) 1.8%
"Marsha Feinland ("P&F) 1.3%
"Edward Noonan ("AIP) 1.3%
Duane Roberts ("G) 1.2%
Colorado Bennet, Michael"Michael Bennet "Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee "elected. √ "Michael Bennet (Democratic) 47.7%
"Ken Buck (Republican) 46.8%
Bob Kinsey (Green) 2.2%
Maclyn Stringer (Libertarian) 1.3%
Connecticut Dodd, Chris"Chris Dodd "Democratic "1980
"1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Democratic hold.
√ "Richard Blumenthal (Democratic) 55.1%
"Linda McMahon (Republican) 43.3%
Warren Mosler (Independent) 1.0%
John Mertens ("CfL) 0.6%
Florida LeMieux, George"George LeMieux "Republican 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Marco Rubio (Republican) 48.9%
"Charlie Crist (Independent) 29.7%
"Kendrick Meek (Democratic) 20.1%
Alexander Snitker (Libertarian) 0.5%
Georgia Isakson, Johnny"Johnny Isakson Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Johnny Isakson (Republican) 58.1%
"Michael Thurmond (Democratic) 39.2%
Chuck Donovan (Libertarian) 2.7%
Hawaii Inouye, Daniel"Daniel Inouye "Democratic "1962
"1968
"1974
"1980
"1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Daniel Inouye (Democratic) 74.8%
"Campbell Cavasso (Republican) 21.6%
James Brewer (Green) 2.1%
Jeff Mallan (Libertarian) 0.8%
Idaho Crapo, Mike"Mike Crapo Republican "1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Mike Crapo (Republican) 71.1%
Tom Sullivan (Democratic) 25.0%
Randy Bergquist (Constitution) 3.9%
Illinois Burris, Roland"Roland Burris "Democratic 2009 (Appointed) Incumbent appointee retired.
New senator "elected.
Winner also elected to finish term ending January 3, 2011, see above.
Republican gain.
√ "Mark Kirk (Republican) 48.2%
"Alexi Giannoulias (Democratic) 46.3%
"LeAlan Jones (Green) 3.2%
Mike Labino (Libertarian) 2.4%
Indiana Bayh, Evan"Evan Bayh "Democratic "1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican gain.
√ "Dan Coats (Republican) 56.4%
"Brad Ellsworth (Democratic) 38.1%
Rebecca Sink-Burris (Libertarian) 5.4%
Iowa Grassley, Chuck"Chuck Grassley Republican "1980
"1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Chuck Grassley (Republican) 64.5%
"Roxanne Conlin (Democratic) 33.2%
John Heiderscheit (Libertarian) 2.3%
Kansas Brownback, Sam"Sam Brownback "Republican "1996 (Special)
"1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Jerry Moran (Republican) 70.3%
Lisa Johnston (Democratic) 26.2%
Michael Dann (Libertarian) 2.1%
Joe Bellis (Reform) 1.4%
Kentucky Bunning, Jim"Jim Bunning "Republican "1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Rand Paul (Republican) 55.8%
"Jack Conway (Democratic) 44.2%
Louisiana Vitter, David"David Vitter "Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "David Vitter (Republican) 56.6%
"Charles Melancon (Democratic) 37.7%
Randall Hayes (Libertarian) 1.1%
Michael Brown (Independent) 0.8%
Maryland Mikulski, Barbara"Barbara Mikulski "Democratic "1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Barbara Mikulski (Democratic) 61.8%
"Eric Wargotz (Republican) 36.3%
Kenniss Henry (Green) 1.1%
Richard Shawver (Constitution) 0.8%
Missouri Bond, Kit"Kit Bond "Republican "1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Roy Blunt (Republican) 54.3%
"Robin Carnahan (Democratic) 40.6%
Jonathan Dine (Libertarian) 3.0%
Jerry Beck (Constitution) 2.1%
Nevada Reid, Harry"Harry Reid "Democratic "1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Harry Reid (Democratic) 50.2%
"Sharron Angle (Republican) 44.6%
"None of These Candidates 2.2%
Scott Ashjian (Tea) 0.8%
New Hampshire Gregg, Judd"Judd Gregg "Republican "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Kelly Ayotte (Republican) 60.2%
"Paul Hodes (Democratic) 36.7%
Chris Booth (Independent) 2.0%
Ken Blevens (Libertarian) 1.0%
New York Schumer, Chuck"Chuck Schumer "Democratic "1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Chuck Schumer (Democratic) 65.4%
"Jay Townsend (Republican) 33.0%
"Colia Clark (Green) 1.0%
"Randy Credico (Libertarian) 0.6%
North Carolina Burr, Richard"Richard Burr "Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Richard Burr (Republican) 55.0%
"Elaine Marshall (Democratic) 42.9%
Mike Beitler (Libertarian) 2.1%
North Dakota Dorgan, Byron"Byron Dorgan "Democratic-NPL "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican gain.
√ "John Hoeven (Republican) 76.2%
"Tracy Potter (Democratic) 22.2%
Keith Hanson (Libertarian) 1.6%
Ohio Voinovich, George"George Voinovich "Republican "1998
"2004
Incumbent retired.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Rob Portman (Republican) 57.3%
"Lee Fisher (Democratic) 39.0%
Eric Deaton (Constitution) 1.7%
Michael Pryce (Independent) 1.3%
Oklahoma Coburn, Tom"Tom Coburn "Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Tom Coburn (Republican) 70.5%
"Jim Rogers (Democratic) 26.1%
Stephen Wallace (Independent) 2.5%
Ronald Dwyer (Independent) 0.9%
Oregon Wyden, Ron"Ron Wyden Democratic "1996 (Special)
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Ron Wyden (Democratic) 57.2%
Jim Huffman (Republican) 39.4%
Bruce Cronk (W.F.) 1.3%
Marc Delphine ("Libertarian) 1.1%
Rick Staggenborg (Progressive) 1.0%
Pennsylvania Specter, Arlen"Arlen Specter "Democratic "1980
"1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent lost renomination.
New senator "elected.
Republican gain.
√ "Pat Toomey (Republican) 51.01%
"Joe Sestak (Democratic) 48.99%
South Carolina DeMint, Jim"Jim DeMint "Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Jim DeMint (Republican) 62.4%
"Alvin Greene (Democratic) 28.2%
Tom Clements (Green) 9.4%
South Dakota Thune, John"John Thune "Republican "2004 Incumbent "re-elected. √ "John Thune (Republican)
Unopposed
Utah Bennett, Bob"Bob Bennett "Republican "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent lost renomination.
New senator "elected.
Republican hold.
√ "Mike Lee (Republican) 61.6%
Sam Granato (Democratic) 32.8%
Scott Bradley (Constitution) 5.7%
Vermont Leahy, Patrick"Patrick Leahy "Democratic "1974
"1980
"1986
"1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Patrick Leahy (Democratic) 64.4%
"Len Britton (Republican) 30.9%
Daniel Freilich (Independent) 1.5%
Cris Ericson (Independent) 1.1%
Stephen Cain (Independent) 1.0%
Washington Murray, Patty"Patty Murray "Democratic "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent "re-elected. √ "Patty Murray (Democratic) 52.4%
"Dino Rossi (Republican) 47.6%
Wisconsin Feingold, Russ"Russ Feingold "Democratic "1992
"1998
"2004
Incumbent lost re-election.
New senator "elected.
Republican gain.
√ "Ron Johnson (Republican) 51.9%
"Russ Feingold (Democratic) 47.0%
Rob Taylor (Constitution) 1.1%

Special elections during the 112th Congress[edit]

There were no special elections in 2011 after January 3.

Alabama[edit]

Alabama election
"Alabama
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Richard Shelby, official portrait, 112th Congress (cropped).jpg ""William G. Barnes.jpg
Nominee "Richard Shelby William G. Barnes
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 967,861 515,049
Percentage 65.3% 34.7%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Richard Shelby
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Richard Shelby
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Richard Shelby won re-election to a fifth term. On November 9, 1994, Shelby switched his party affiliation from Democratic to Republican, one day after the Republicans won control of both houses in the midterm elections, giving the Republicans a 53-47 majority in the Senate. He won his first full term as a Republican in 1998 by a large margin, and faced no significant opposition in 2004 and 2010.

Republican primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Richard Shelby (Incumbent) 405,042 84.4%
"Republican Clint Moser 75,190 15.6%
Total votes 479,189 100.0%

Shelby had over $17 million in the bank, one of the highest of any candidate in the country. He had become even more popular in his opposition to the "Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) and the "Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, as the ranking member of the "Senate Banking Committee.

In May, Shelby told reporters "I don't even know who my opponent is."[2]

United States Senate election in Alabama, 2010[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Richard Shelby (Incumbent) 968,181 65.3%
"Democratic William G. Barnes 515,619 34.7%
Total votes 1,482,910 100.0%
"Turnout N/A
"Republican hold

Alaska[edit]

Alaska election
"Alaska
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Lisa Murkowski 1.jpg ""Joe Miller at Carlson Center, Fairbanks, Alaska - 201010.jpg ""Scott McAdams cropped.jpg
Candidate "Lisa Murkowski "Joe Miller "Scott McAdams
Party "Republican "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 101,091 90,839 60,045
Percentage 39.5% 35.5% 23.5%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Lisa Murkowski
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Lisa Murkowski
"Republican

The November general election in Alaska was preceded by "primary elections which were held August 24, 2010. "Scott McAdams, the Mayor of "Sitka, became the Democratic nominee and "Joe Miller, an attorney and former federal magistrate, became the Republican nominee after defeating incumbent Senator "Lisa Murkowski[4] in the Republican primary.[5]

Murkowski garnered more than 100,000 write-in votes in the general election, 8,000 of which were challenged by Miller for various errors including minor misspellings.[6] Even if the challenged votes were all thrown out, Murkowski still had a lead of over 2,100 votes when the counting was done.[7]

Alaska Democratic primary election[8][9]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Scott McAdams 18,035 49.99%
"Democratic Jacob Seth Kern 6,913 19.16%
"Libertarian David Haase 5,793 16.06%
"Democratic Frank Vondersaar 5,339 14.80%
Total votes 36,080 100.00%
"Turnout 32
Republican primary election[8][9]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Joe Miller 55,878 50.91%
"Republican Lisa Murkowski (Incumbent) 53,872 49.09%
Total votes 109,750 100.00%
"Turnout 32
Alaska general election[10][11][12]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Write-in Lisa Murkowski (Incumbent) 101,091 39.49%
"Republican Joe Miller 90,839 35.49%
"Democratic Scott McAdams 60,045 23.46%
"Libertarian David Haase 1,459 0.57%
"Independent Timothy Carter 927 0.36%
"Independent Ted Gianoutsos 458 0.18%
"Write-in Other write-in votes 1,143 0.44%
Invalid or blank votes 2,784 1.08%
Total votes 258,746 100.00%
"Turnout 52.3

Arizona[edit]

Arizona election
"Arizona
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""John McCain official portrait 2009.jpg ""Rodney Glassman.jpg
Nominee "John McCain "Rodney Glassman
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,005,615 592,011
Percentage 58.7% 34.5%

"U.S. Senator before election

"John McCain
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"John McCain
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "John McCain, who returned to the Senate after losing the presidency to "Barack Obama in the "2008 presidential election, ran for re-election to a fifth term and won.[13]

Democratic primary election[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Rodney Glassman 86,881 34.7%
"Democratic Cathy Eden 66,421 26.5%
"Democratic John Dougherty 60,262 24.1%
"Democratic Randy Parraz 36,637 14.6%
Total votes 250,201 100.0%
Republican primary election[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican John McCain (Incumbent) 284,374 56.2%
"Republican J.D. Hayworth 162,502 32.1%
"Republican Jim Deakin 59,447 11.7%
Total votes 506,323 100.0%

After spending over $20 million during the primaries, McCain still had more than $1million cash on hand after the primary election. Glassman criticized McCain on women's issues.[15] In August 2010, Glassman released a TV advertisement called "Arizona First."[16]

United States Senate election in Arizona, 2010[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican John McCain (Incumbent) 1,005,615 59.07% -17.67%
"Democratic Rodney Glassman 592,011 34.78% +14.16%
"Libertarian "David Nolan 80,097 4.71% +2.06%
"Green Jerry Joslyn 24,603 1.45% N/A
Majority 413,604 24.30%
Total votes 1,702,326 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Arkansas[edit]

Arkansas election
"Arkansas
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""John Boozman, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Blanche Lincoln, 2007.jpg
Nominee "John Boozman "Blanche Lincoln
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 451,617 288,156
Percentage 57.90% 36.95%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Blanche Lincoln
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"John Boozman
"Republican

Incumbent Democrat "Blanche Lincoln ran for re-election to a third term, but lost to Republican nominee "John Boozman. Boozman became the first Republican in "138 years to win the seat. Arkansas had previously only elected one Republican senator since the "Reconstruction, who was defeated after his first term in 2002 by "Mark Pryor.

Democratic primary election[18]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Blanche Lincoln (Incumbent) 146,579 44.5%
"Democratic Bill Halter 140,081 42.5%
"Democratic D.C. Morrison 42,695 13.0%
Total votes 329,355 100.0%
Democratic primary election runoff[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Blanche Lincoln (Incumbent) 134,758 52.0%
"Democratic Bill Halter 124,405 48.0%
Total votes 259,163 100.0%

The Republican primary was held May 18, 2010, with "early voting from May 3–17.

Republican primary election[20]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican John Boozman 75,010 52.7%
"Republican Jim Holt 24,826 17.5%
"Republican Gilbert Baker 16,540 11.6%
"Republican Conrad Reynolds 7,128 5.0%
"Republican Curtis Coleman 6,928 4.9%
"Republican Kim Hendren 5,551 3.9%
"Republican Randy Alexander 4,389 3.1%
"Republican Fred Ramey 1,888 1.3%
Total votes 142,260 100.0%
United States Senate election in Arkansas, 2010[21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican John Boozman 451,617 57.90% +13.83%
"Democratic Blanche Lincoln (Incumbent) 288,156 36.95% -18.95%
"Libertarian Trevor Drown 25,234 3.24% +3.24%
"Green John Gray 14,430 1.85% +1.85%
Majority 163,461 20.95%
Total votes 779,437 100.00%
"Turnout
"Republican gain from "Democratic "Swing

California[edit]

California election
"California
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Barbara Boxer, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Carly Fiorina in Sao Paulo, Brazil - 2004.jpg
Nominee "Barbara Boxer "Carly Fiorina
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 5,218,441 4,217,366
Percentage 52.2% 42.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Barbara Boxer
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Barbara Boxer
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Barbara Boxer won re-election to a fourth term.

In 2009, Boxer was criticized for correcting a general who called her "ma'am". Brigadier General Michael Walsh was testifying on the Louisiana coastal restoration process in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and answered Boxer's query with "ma'am" when Boxer interrupted him. "Do me a favor," Boxer said. "can you say 'senator' instead of 'ma'am?'" "Yes, ma'am," Walsh interjected. "It's just a thing, I worked so hard to get that title, so I'd appreciate it. Thank you," she said. The Army's guide to protocol instructs service members to call members of the U.S. Senate "sir", "ma'am" or "senator".[22][23][24] Fiorina used this incident prominently in campaign ads, as did "David Zucker, who directed a humorous commercial for "RightChange.com titled 'Call Me Senator.' In February 2010, Carly Fiorina put out a campaign ad attacking Republican rival "Tom Campbell featuring a ""demon sheep", creating international, mostly negative, publicity.[25]

California Democratic Senate primary, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Barbara Boxer (Incumbent) 1,957,920 81.0%
Brian Quintana 338,442 13.9%
Mickey Kaus 123,573 5.1%
Total votes 2,419,935 100.0%
California Republican Senate primary, 2010
Candidate Votes Percentage
Carly Fiorina 1,315,429 56.4%
Tom Campbell 504,289 21.7%
Chuck DeVore 452,577 19.3%
Al Ramirez 42,149 1.8%
Tim Kalemkarian 19,598 0.8%
Total votes 2,334,042 100.0%
California general election
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Barbara Boxer (Incumbent) 5,218,441 52.2%
"Republican Carly Fiorina 4,217,366 42.2%
"Libertarian (Calif.) Gail Lightfoot 175,242 1.8%
"Peace and Freedom Marsha Feinland 135,093 1.4%
"Green (Calif.) Duane Roberts 128,510 1.2%
"American Independent Edward Noonan 125,441 1.2%
Write-ins 67 <0.1%
Total votes 10,000,160 100.0%

Colorado[edit]

Colorado election
"Colorado
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Michael Bennet Official Photo (cropped).jpg ""Ken Buck official congressional photo.jpg
Nominee "Michael Bennet "Ken Buck
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 851,590 822,731
Percentage 48.1% 46.4%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Michael Bennet
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Michael Bennet
"Democratic

In December 2008, "President-elect "Barack Obama selected incumbent U.S. Senator "Ken Salazar to become "U.S. Secretary of the Interior.[26] After Salazar resigned from his seat,[27] Democratic "Governor "Bill Ritter appointed "Denver Public Schools "Superintendent "Michael Bennet to fill the seat, who won re-election to his first full term.[28][29]

Colorado Democratic primary election[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Michael Bennet (Incumbent) 183,225 54.2%
"Democratic Andrew Romanoff 154,961 45.8%
Total votes 338,186 100.00%
Colorado Republican primary election[30]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Ken Buck 209,638 51.6%
"Republican Jane Norton 196,954 48.4%
Total votes 406,592 100.0%

This was one of the most expensive elections in the nation, as more than $30 million was spent by outside organizations.[31] Conservative third party groups hammered Bennet for voting 92% of the time with the Democratic leadership, including voting for healthcare reform and the stimulus package.[32] Liberal third party groups called Buck extremist. Bennet focused on attacking Buck's views on abortion, which he believed should be banned including those of cases of "rape and "incest. He was also attacked for wanting to eliminate the "17th Amendment[33] and refusing to prosecute an alleged rapist as Weld County district attorney. "Planned Parenthood mounted a mail campaign, targeting women voters with the warning that "Colorado women can't trust Ken Buck." Bennet won the women vote by 17 points according to exit polls. After the election, Buck conceded to the "Denver Post that the main reason why he lost is because of social issues.[34]

United States Senate election in Colorado, 2010[35][36][37]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Michael Bennet (Incumbent) 851,590 48.1%
"Republican Ken Buck 822,731 46.4%
"Green Bob Kinsey 38,768 2.2%
"Libertarian Maclyn Stringer 22,589 1.3%
"Independent Jason Napolitano 19,415 1.1%
"Independent Charley Miller 11,330 0.6%
"Independent J. Moromisato 5,767 0.3%
Total votes 1,772,190 100.0%
"Turnout {{{votes}}} N/A

Connecticut[edit]

Connecticut election
"Connecticut
← "2004
"2016 →
Turnout 45.9% (voting eligible)
  ""Richard Blumenthal Official Portrait.jpg ""Linda McMahon Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic.jpg
Nominee "Richard Blumenthal "Linda McMahon
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 636,040 498,341
Percentage 55.2% 43.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Chris Dodd
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Richard Blumenthal
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Christopher Dodd suffered from dropping approval ratings in the past few years due to major controversies, leading him to announce in January 2010 that he would retire, instead of seeking a sixth term.[38] As Dodd was a Democrat, "Richard Blumenthal, incumbent "State Attorney General, announced on the same day that he would run for Dodd's seat.[39] The "Connecticut Democratic Party nominated Blumenthal on May 21. Businesswoman "Linda McMahon won the "state party's nominating convention and the August 10 Republican primary to become the Republican candidate.[40]

Republican primary election[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Linda McMahon 60,479 49.44%
"Republican Rob Simmons 34,011 27.80%
"Republican Peter Schiff 27,831 22.75%
Total votes 122,321 100.00%
United States Senate election in Connecticut, 2010[42][43]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Richard Blumenthal 636,040 55.16% -11.20%
"Republican Linda E. McMahon 498,341 43.22% +11.08%
"Independent Warren B. Mosler 11,275 0.98% N/A
"Connecticut for Lieberman Dr. John Mertens 6,735 0.58% N/A
"Write-in Write-in candidates (8) 724 0.06% N/A
Majority 137,755 11.95%
Total votes 1,153,115 100.00%
"Democratic hold

Note: Blumenthal also appeared on the line of the "Connecticut Working Families Party and received 30,836 votes on it. His Working Families and Democratic votes have been aggregated together on this table.

Delaware (Special)[edit]

Delaware special election
"Delaware
← "2008
"2014 →
  ""Chris Coons, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Christine O'Donnell by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Nominee "Chris Coons "Christine O'Donnell
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 174,012 123,053
Percentage 56.6% 40.0%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Ted Kaufman
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Chris Coons
"Democratic

This was a "special election to fill Delaware's Class 2 Senate seat, then held by "Ted Kaufman, an appointee. The seat had been previously held by long-time Senator "Joe Biden, who vacated it when he became "Vice President of the United States in 2009.

Delaware Republican primary election
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Christine O'Donnell 30,561 53.1%
"Republican Michael N. Castle 27,021 46.9%
Total votes 57,582 100.0%
United States Senate special election in Delaware, 2010[44]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic "Chris Coons 174,012 56.61% -8.07%
"Republican "Christine O'Donnell 123,053 40.03% +4.72%
"Delaware Independent Glenn Miller 8,201 2.67%
"Libertarian James Rash 2,101 0.69%
Majority 50,959 16.58% -12.79%
Total votes 307,367 100.00%
"Democratic hold "Swing

Florida[edit]

Florida election
"Florida
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Marco Rubio.jpg ""Charlie Crist official portrait crop.jpg ""Kendrick Meek official portrait.jpg
Nominee "Marco Rubio "Charlie Crist "Kendrick Meek
Party "Republican "Independent "Democratic
Popular vote 2,645,743 1,607,549 1,092,936
Percentage 48.9% 29.7% 20.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"George LeMieux
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Marco Rubio
"Republican

Incumbent Republican Senator "Mel Martínez, who was elected in a very close race against Democrat "Betty Castor with 49% of the vote in "2004, announced on December 2, 2008, that he would not run for re-election to a second term,[45] then announcing on August 7, 2009, that he would resign prior to the end of his term.[46] The "Governor of Florida, Republican "Charlie Crist, was required to appoint a successor and he chose his former Chief of Staff, "George LeMieux. LeMieux, a "placeholder who did not run in the election, replaced Martínez in the Senate on September 10, 2009.

Crist publicly announced he was running for the seat in mid-2009. When he declared his candidacy, he received many Republican endorsements, including the "National Republican Senatorial Committee, Martínez, and 2008 Republican presidential nominee "John McCain. However, his support of the "American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 hurt his popularity among conservatives, and "Tea Party candidate "Marco Rubio, the former "Speaker of the "Florida House of Representatives, surged in the polls. In April 2010, Crist announced he would drop out of the Republican primary and run as an Independent. The National Republican Senatorial Committee withdrew its endorsement of Crist and demanded a refund of its campaign funds that it provided for the Crist campaign.[47][48][49] Rubio went on to win the Republican primary against only token opposition.

Polling initially showed Crist neck and neck with Rubio, but by the end of August Rubio opened up a solid and consistent lead. He was supported by Republican and some Independent voters whereas Democratic and other Independents were split between Crist and Meek. Rubio went on to win the election with 49% of the vote to Crist's 30% and Meek's 20%.

Republican primary election[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Marco Rubio 1,059,513 84.6%
"Republican William Kogut 111,584 8.9%
"Republican William Escoffery 81,873 6.5%
Total votes 1,252,970 100.0%
Democratic primary election[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Kendrick Meek 522,942 57.4%
"Democratic Jeff Greene 283,370 31.1%
"Democratic Glenn Burkett 59,575 6.5%
"Democratic Maurice Ferré 44,506 4.9%
Total votes 910,393 100.0%
United States Senate election in Florida, 2010[52]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Marco Antonio Rubio 2,645,743 48.89% -0.54%
"Independent Charles Joseph Crist Jr. 1,607,549 29.71% +29.71%
"Democratic Kendrick Brett Meek 1,092,936 20.20% -28.12%
"Libertarian Alexander Snitker 24,850 0.46% N/A
"Independent Sue Askeland 15,340 0.28% N/A
"Independent Rick Tyler 7,394 0.14% N/A
"Constitution Bernie DeCastro 4,792 0.09% N/A
"Independent Lewis Jerome Armstrong 4,443 0.08% N/A
"Independent Bobbie Bean 4,301 0.08% N/A
"Independent Bruce Riggs 3,647 0.07% N/A
Write-ins 108 0.00%
Majority 1,038,194 19.19% +18.08%
"Turnout 5,411,106 48.25%[53] -22.67%
Total votes 5,411,106 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Georgia[edit]

Georgia election
"Georgia (U.S. state)
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Johnny Isakson, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Michael Thurmond.jpg
Nominee "Johnny Isakson "Mike Thurmond
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,489,904 996,516
Percentage 58.3% 39.0%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Johnny Isakson
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Johnny Isakson
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Johnny Isakson won re-election to a second term.[54]

Democratic primary election[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Michael Thurmond 297,226 84.3%
"Democratic RJ Hadley 55,159 15.7%
Total votes 352,385 100.0%
Republican primary election[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Johnny Isakson 558,298 100.00%
Total votes 558,298 100.00%
United States Senate election in Georgia, 2010[57]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Johnny Isakson (Incumbent) 1,489,904 58.31% +0.43%
"Democratic Michael Thurmond 996,516 39.00% -0.98%
"Libertarian Chuck Donovan 68,750 2.69% +0.55%
"Independent Steve Davis ("write-in) 52 0.00% N/A
"Independent Raymond Beckworth ("write-in) 24 0.00% N/A
"Independent Brian Russell Brown ("write-in) 12 0.00% N/A
Majority 493,388 19.31%
Total votes 2,555,258 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Hawaii[edit]

Hawaii election
"Hawaii
← "2004
"2014 →
  ""Daniel Inouye, official Senate photo portrait, 2008.jpg ""Cam Cavasso.jpg
Nominee "Daniel Inouye "Cam Cavasso
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 277,228 79,939
Percentage 74.8% 21.6%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Daniel Inouye
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Daniel Inouye
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat and "President pro tempore "Daniel Inouye won re-election to his ninth term.

Hawaii last elected a Republican Senator in 1970, and its current delegation to the "United States Congress currently consists entirely of Democrats. Democrats have also won Hawaii's "electoral votes in every "presidential election since "Ronald Reagan's "landslide election in 1984. The exceptions at the time were then-"Governor "Linda Lingle (who was serving her second and final term) and then-"U.S. Representative "Charles Djou, both of whom are Republicans.

Democratic primary election[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Daniel Inouye (Incumbent) 188,400 88.3%
"Democratic Andy Woerner 25,016 11.7%
Total votes 213,416 100.0%
Republican primary election[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Campbell Cavasso 21,865 66.7%
"Republican John Roco 7,190 21.9%
"Republican Eddie Pirkowski 3,744 11.4%
Total votes 32,790 100.0%
United States Senate election in Hawaii, 2010[59]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Daniel Inouye (Incumbent) 277,228 74.81% -0.70%
"Republican Cam Cavasso 79,939 21.57% +0.58%
"Green Jim Brewer 7,762 2.09% N/A
"Libertarian Lloyd Jeffrey Mallen 2,957 0.80% -0.47%
"Independent Jeff Jarrett 2,697 0.73% N/A
Majority 197,289 53.24%
Total votes 370,583 100.00%
"Democratic hold "Swing

Idaho[edit]

Idaho election
"Idaho
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Mike Crapo Official Photo 110th Congress.jpg ""Tom Sullivan 2.jpg
Nominee "Mike Crapo "Tom Sullivan
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 319,953 112,057
Percentage 71.2% 24.9%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Mike Crapo
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Mike Crapo
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Mike Crapo won re-election to a third term.

Idaho Republican primary election[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Mike Crapo (Incumbent) 127,332 79.3%
"Republican Claude "Skip" Davis 33,150 20.7%
Total votes 160,482 100.0%
Idaho Democratic primary election[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Tom Sullivan 18,340 74.7%
"Democratic William Bryk 6,227 25.3%
Total votes 24,567 100.0%

Sullivan, a heavy underdog, criticized Crapo for being in Washington for too long saying "Senator Crapo has been in Congress for 18 years. The country is struggling, and I think it's time to make a change." Crapo emphasized his conservative record in Washington.[61]

United States Senate election in Idaho, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Michael Crapo (Incumbent) 319,953 71.19% -27.99%
"Democratic Tom Sullivan 112,057 24.93% N/A
"Constitution Randy Bergquist 17,429 3.88% N/A
Majority 207,896 46.26%
Total votes 449,439 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Illinois[edit]

Illinois election
"Illinois
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Senator Mark Kirk official portrait crop.jpg ""Alexi Giannoulias.jpg
Nominee "Mark Kirk "Alexi Giannoulias
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,778,698 1,719,478
Percentage 48.0% 46.4%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Roland Burris
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Mark Kirk
"Republican

Incumbent Democrat "Roland Burris did not run in 2010.[62] He suffered from poor approval ratings[63] and was investigated by the "Sangamon County, Illinois State's Attorney for "perjury.[64] Although no criminal charges were filed against him, he faced an investigation by the "Senate Ethics Committee.[65]

There were two ballot items for the same seat: a general election, to fill the "Class 3 seat beginning with the "112th United States Congress beginning on January 3, 2011, and a special election, to fill that seat for the final weeks of the "111th Congress, replacing the temporary appointment of "Roland Burris to the vacancy created by "Barack Obama's election to the presidency.[66]

A "federal court ruled that the candidates appearing on the ballot for the replacement election would be the ones of the regular election,[66][67] and that the special election would appear after the general election on the ballot.[67]

As of December 2017, this is the last Senate election in Illinois won by a Republican.

Democratic primary election (February 2, 2010)[68]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Alexi Giannoulias 351,120 38.9%
"Democratic David Hoffman 303,719 33.7%
"Democratic Cheryle Jackson 178,941 19.8%
"Democratic Robert Marshall 51,606 5.7%
"Democratic Jacob Meister 16,232 1.8%
Total votes 901,618 100.0%
Illinois Republican primary election (February 2, 2010)[69]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Mark Kirk 420,373 56.6
"Republican Patrick Hughes 142,928 19.3
"Republican Donald Lowery 66,357 8.9
"Republican Kathleen Thomas 54,038 7.3
"Republican Andy Martin 37,480 5.0
"Republican John Arrington 21,090 2.8
"Republican Patricia Beard 2 .0003
Total votes 742,268 100.0%
Illinois special election[70]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Mark Kirk 1,677,729 47.3
"Democratic Alexi Giannoulias 1,641,486 46.3
"Green LeAlan Jones 129,571 3.7
"Libertarian Michael Labno 95,762 2.7
Write-ins 1,436 <0.1 N/A
Total votes 3,545,984 100.00%
Illinois general election[71]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Mark Kirk 1,778,698 48.0 +21.0
"Democratic Alexi Giannoulias 1,719,478 46.4 -25.6
"Green LeAlan Jones 117,914 3.2 N/A
"Libertarian Michael Labno 87,247 2.4 +1.1
Write-ins 1,136 <0.1 N/A
Majority 59,220 1.6 -51.4
"Turnout 3,704,473 -27.9
"Republican gain from "Democratic "Swing

Indiana[edit]

Indiana election
"Indiana
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Dan Coats, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Brad Ellsworth, official 110th Congress photo.jpg
Nominee "Dan Coats "Brad Ellsworth
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 952,116 697,775
Percentage 54.6% 40.0%

 
Nominee Rebecca Sink-Burris
Party "Libertarian
Popular vote 94,330
Percentage 5.4%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Evan Bayh
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Dan Coats[72]
"Republican

Incumbent Democrat "Evan Bayh decided in February 2010 to retire instead of seeking a third term shortly after former U.S. Senator "Dan Coats announced his candidacy for Bayh's contested seat.[73] No Democratic candidate submitted enough signatures by the deadline to run, leading Democratic officials to choose U.S. Congressman "Brad Ellsworth to be the nominee. Coats won the election.

Indiana Republican primary election[74]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Dan Coats 217,225 39.5%
"Republican Marlin Stutzman 160,981 29.2%
"Republican John Hostettler 124,494 22.6%
"Republican Don Bates, Jr. 24,664 4.5%
"Republican Richard Behney 23,005 4.2%
Total votes 550,369 100.0%

After Coats's win in the Republican primary, Ellsworth began to heavily criticize Coats for his ties to lobbyists. He called for more disclosure of the meetings lawmakers have with lobbyists, banning congressional staff from lobbying for six years after their congressional jobs, requiring Congress members to put all their investments in blind trusts, more disclosure of Senate candidates' personal financial information, and changes to the U.S. Senate filibuster rules. He proposed lowering number of votes required to break a filibuster to 55 from the current 60.[75] In response to Ellsworth's charges, Coats published his lobbying record in an 815-page document.

Coats emphasized the individual issues rather than ethics reforms advocated by his opponent. He focused on Ellsworth's record of voting in support of the "Economic Stimulus Act of 2008, cap-and-trade legislation, and "health care bill. Coats opinion of the healthcare law was that "the only responsible solution … is to repeal the Obama-Pelosi-Ellsworth health spending bill and quickly replace it with cost-effective, incremental pieces that will decrease costs, increase coverage and not break the bank."

Indiana general election[76]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Dan Coats 952,116 54.60% +17.37%
"Democratic Brad Ellsworth 697,775 40.01% -21.64%
"Libertarian Rebecca Sink-Burris 94,330 5.39% +4.27%
Majority 254,341 14.58%
Total votes 1,743,921 100.00%
"Republican gain from "Democratic "Swing

Iowa[edit]

Iowa election
"Iowa
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Sen Chuck Grassley official.jpg ""Roxanne Conlin crop.jpg
Nominee "Chuck Grassley "Roxanne Conlin
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 718,215 371,686
Percentage 64.4% 33.3%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Chuck Grassley
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Chuck Grassley
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Chuck Grassley won re-election to a sixth term.

Republican primary election[77]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Chuck Grassley (inc.) 197,194 98.0%
"Republican Write-ins 3,926 2.0%
Total votes 201,120 100.0%
Democratic primary election[77]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Roxanne Conlin 52,715 77.5%
"Democratic Bob Krause 8,728 12.9%
"Democratic Tom Fiegen 6,357 9.4%
"Democratic Write-ins 177 0.2%
Total votes 67,977 100.0%

Incumbent "Chuck Grassley started the campaign moderately popular, but his approval ratings dropped somewhat during the campaign.[78] However, the seat continued to be considered to be "Safe Republican" by many sources, with CQ Politics noting that Grassley is "one of Iowa's most durable politicians."

Conlin described herself as a "prairie progressive." She supported the recent landmark case of "Varnum v. Brien, which legalized gay marriage in the state. She also supported repeal of ""don't ask, don't tell."[79]

Before the election, former political advisor John Maxwell claimed that Grassley would have his toughest race since his first U.S. Senate election in "1980, where he defeated incumbent "John Culver with 53% of the vote. Grassley won all of his four re-election bids with nearly 70% of the vote against unknown opponents.[80] Grassley won the election with 64.51% of the vote.

United States Senate election in Iowa, 2010[81]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican "Chuck Grassley (Incumbent) 718,215 64.35% -5.83%
"Democratic "Roxanne Conlin 371,686 33.30% +5.43%
"Libertarian John Heiderscheit 25,290 2.27%
Write-ins 872 0.08%
Majority 346,529 31.05% -11.26%
"Turnout 1,116,063
"Republican hold "Swing

Kansas[edit]

Kansas election
"Kansas
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Jerry Moran, official Congressional photo portrait.jpg ""No image.png
Nominee "Jerry Moran Lisa Johnston
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 578,768 215,270
Percentage 70.3% 26.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Sam Brownback
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Jerry Moran
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Sam Brownback retired to "run for Governor of Kansas, instead of seeking a third term. Republican nominee "Jerry Moran won the open seat. Kansas is one of the most Republican states in the nation;["citation needed] no Democrat has been elected to either Senate seat since 1932.

Democratic primary election[82]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Lisa Johnston 25,421 31.2%
"Democratic Charles Schollenberger 19,228 23.6%
"Democratic David Haley 15,584 19.2%
"Democratic Patrick Wiesner 13,359 16.4%
"Democratic Robert Conroy 7,779 9.6%
Total votes 81,371 100.00%

The retirement of Brownback, a popular U.S. Senator, led to a heavily competitive primary election. Tiahrt, who was on the "Committee of Appropriations, had been accused of excessive earmarking while he was in Congress. From 2006-2008, Tiahrt had requested and supported a total of 63 solo earmarks, costing $53.9 million. In the same period, Moran had requested and supported a total of 29 earmarks, with a pricetag of $13.4 million.[83][84]

Republican primary election[82]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Jerry Moran 161,407 49.8%
"Republican Todd Tiahrt 144,372 44.6%
"Republican Tom Little 10,104 3.1%
"Republican Bob Londerholm 8,168 2.5%
Total votes 324,051 100.00%

After the primaries, Moran chose not to release any more negative advertisements. Democrat Lisa Johnston ran a low-profile, quiet race. On election day, she won only two counties: "Wyandotte County and "Douglas County, while Moran won statewide by a landslide.[85]

United States Senate election in Kansas, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Jerry Moran 578,768 70.34% +1.18%
"Democratic Lisa Johnston 215,270 26.16% -1.33%
"Libertarian Michael Dann 17,437 2.12% +0.18%
"Reform Joe Bellis 11,356 1.38% -0.04%
Majority 363,498 44.18%
Total votes 822,831 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Kentucky[edit]

Kentucky election
"Kentucky
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Rand Paul, official portrait, 112th Congress alternate.jpg ""JackConway.jpg
Nominee "Rand Paul "Jack Conway
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 755,411 599,843
Percentage 55.7% 44.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Jim Bunning
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Rand Paul
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Jim Bunning retired instead of seeking a third term. Republican nominee "Rand Paul won the open seat.[86]

On May 18, 2010, Paul won the Republican nomination.[86] After conceding the election to Paul, Grayson said, "It's time to put all differences aside, unite behind Dr. Paul, he needs our help and I for one stand ready to serve".[87]

Republican primary election[88]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Rand Paul 206,986 58.8%
"Republican Trey Grayson 124,864 35.4%
"Republican Bill Johnson 7,861 2.2%
"Republican John Stephenson 6,885 2.0%
"Republican Gurley L. Martin 2,850 0.8%
"Republican Jon J. Scribner 2,829 0.8%
Total votes 352,275 100.0%
Democratic primary election[88]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Jack Conway 229,433 44.0%
"Democratic Daniel Mongiardo 225,260 43.2%
"Democratic Darlene Fitzgerald Price 28,531 5.5%
"Democratic James Buckmaster 20,561 3.9%
"Democratic Maurice Sweeney 17,874 3.4%
Total votes 521,659 100.0%

Grayson attacked Paul for his "strange ideas," such as his opposition of the "PATRIOT Act, and what Grayson alleged to be his support of closing down "Guantanamo Bay and saying that "Iran was not a threat. He also attacked Paul for being a "Duke University fan.["citation needed] He sent out another TV ad and web video that stirred controversy by making the case that Paul believes that foreign policy decisions made prior to September 11, 2001 are partially to blame for the attacks.[89] Paul immediately responded by launching a statewide television ad in which he expresses his "outrage at terrorists who killed 3,000 innocents" before accusing Grayson of a "lie" and a "shameful" tactic.[90] Grayson accused the "Fox News Channel of favoring Paul over him.

Conway began the race trailing Paul, but as he attacked his opponent's positions on social-welfare and criminal-justice policies, the polls began to tighten. The campaign attracted $8.5 million in contributions from outside groups, of which $6 million was spent to help Rand Paul and $2.5 million to help Conway. This money influx was in addition to the money spent by the candidates themselves: $6 million by Paul and $4.7 million by Conway.[91][92]

Kentucky general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Rand Paul 755,411 55.69% +5.03%
"Democratic Jack Conway 599,617 44.26% -5.12%
Majority 155,599 11.48%
Total votes 1,354,833 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Louisiana[edit]

Louisiana election
"Louisiana
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""DVitterOfficial.jpg ""Charles Melancon.jpg
Nominee "David Vitter "Charlie Melancon
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 715,304 476,423
Percentage 56.6% 37.7%

"U.S. Senator before election

"David Vitter
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"David Vitter
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "David Vitter won re-election to a second term. Some speculated that Vitter's re-election might have become complicated, by the prostitution scandal revealed in 2007, but he continued to lead in aggregate polling against potential opponents.[93]

Louisiana Democratic primary election[94]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Charlie Melançon 77,702 70.6%
"Democratic Neeson Chauvin 19,507 17.7%
"Democratic Cary Deaton 12,842 11.7%
Total votes 110,051 100.0%
Louisiana Republican primary election[94]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican David Vitter (Incumbent) 85,179 87.6%
"Republican Chet Traylor 6,838 7.0%
"Republican Nick Accardo 5,221 5.4%
Total votes 97,238 100.0%

Melançon heavily criticized Vitter for "prostitution sex scandal.[95][96] Vitter released television advertising criticizing Melancon for his support for Obama's stimulus package and his support for "amnesty for "illegal immigrants.[97] Melancon claimed "In August, Melancon challenged Vitter to a series of five live, televised town hall-style debates across the state. In his 2004 campaign for Senate, Vitter committed to five live, televised debates. Since Melancon issued the challenge, Vitter and Melancon have been invited to a total of seven live, televised debates. Vitter only accepted invitations to debates hosted by WWL-TV and WDSU-TV, both in New Orleans."[98]

Louisiana general election[99]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican David Vitter (Incumbent) 715,304 56.56% +5.53%
"Democratic Charlie Melancon 476,423 37.67% +8.44%
"Libertarian Randall Hayes 13,952 1.10% N/A
"Independent Michael Brown 9,970 0.79% N/A
"Independent Mike Spears 9,188 0.73% N/A
"Independent Ernest Wooton 8,164 0.65% N/A
"Independent Skip Galan 7,471 0.59% N/A
"Reform William McShan 5,879 0.46% N/A
"Independent Bob Lang 5,732 0.45% N/A
"Independent Milton Gordon 4,806 0.38% N/A
"Independent Tommy LaFargue 4,042 0.32% N/A
"Independent Sam Melton 3,779 0.30% N/A
Majority 238,881 18.89%
Total votes 1,264,710 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Maryland[edit]

Maryland election
"Maryland
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Barbara Mikulski official portrait c. 2011.jpg ""Eric Wargotz.jpg
Nominee "Barbara Mikulski Eric Wargotz
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 1,140,531 655,666
Percentage 62.2% 35.8%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Barbara Mikulski
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Barbara Mikulski
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Barbara Mikulski won re-election to a fifth term.

Democratic primary election[100]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Barbara Mikulski (Incumbent) 388,868 82.32%
"Democratic Christopher J. Garner 35,579 7.53%
"Democratic A. Billy Bob Jaworski 15,131 3.20%
"Democratic Blaine Taylor 10,787 2.28%
"Democratic Theresa C. Scaldaferri 7,913 1.68%
"Democratic Sanquetta Taylor 7,365 1.56%
"Democratic Lih Young 6,733 1.43%
Total votes 472,376 100.00%
Republican primary election[100]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Eric Wargotz 92,464 38.57%
"Republican Jim Rutledge 73,311 30.58%
"Republican Joseph Alexander 14,026 5.85%
"Republican Neil H. Cohen 13,613 5.68%
"Republican Stephens Dempsey 9,325 3.89%
"Republican Daniel W. McAndrew 8,460 3.53%
"Republican John B. Kimble 8,081 3.37%
"Republican Samuel R. Graham, Sr. 6,600 2.75%
"Republican Barry Steve Asbury 5,900 2.46%
"Republican Eddie Vendetti 5,046 2.10%
"Republican Gregory Kump 2,931 1.22%
Total votes 239,757 100.00%

Republican nominee Eric Wargotz, "Queen Anne's County Commissioner and physician, compared Mikulski to a "dinosaur by calling her a political "insidersaurus" for being in Washington for over thirty years. An ad showed a hammer hitting a brick wall, breaking it down and citing criticisms of Mikulski's record as a U.S. Senator. Mikulski released positive advertisements emphsizing education and job creation.[101] Despite Wargotz's limited campaign and resources he received the highest percentage of votes against Mikulski as an incumbent U.S. Senator

United States Senate election in Maryland, 2010[102]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Barbara Mikulski (Incumbent) 1,140,531 62.19% -2.61%
"Republican Eric Wargotz 655,666 35.75% +2.05%
"Green Kenniss Henry 20,717 1.13% +0.06%
"Constitution Richard Shawver 14,746 0.80% +0.42%
Write-ins 2,213 0.11% +0.05%
Majority 484,865 26.44%
Total votes 1,833,873 100.00%
"Democratic hold "Swing

Massachusetts (Special)[edit]

Massachusetts special election
"Massachusetts
← "2006 January 19, 2010 "2012 →
  ""Sbrownofficial.jpg ""Martha Coakley crop.jpg
Nominee "Scott Brown "Martha Coakley
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,168,107 1,058,682
Percentage 51.9% 47.1%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Paul Kirk
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Scott Brown
"Republican

A "Special election was held January 19, 2010 to fill the Class 1 seat for the remainder of the term ending January 3, 2013. It was won by Republican "Scott Brown.

The vacancy that prompted the special election was created by the death of Democratic Senator "Ted Kennedy on August 25, 2009. (Kennedy served as Senator since 1962, having been elected in a "special election in 1962 to fill the vacancy created when his brother "John F. Kennedy was "elected President of the United States in 1960.) The seat was held until the election by an appointee, Senator "Paul Kirk, a former chairman of the "Democratic National Committee, who was not a candidate in the election to complete the term.

The election was viewed by conservatives outside of Massachusetts as a "referendum against President "Barack Obama.[103] But Brown stated that he didn't believe that it was a referendum on Obama.[104] Although Democrats would retain control of both Houses of Congress until January 2011, Brown's victory greatly affected their political plans, most notably for the "Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, though the legislation was signed into law two months later.[105][106] Brown became the first Republican to win this seat since the Democrats captured it in "1952. As of 2017, this is the last Senate election in Massachusetts won by a Republican.

Massachusetts Democratic primary election[107]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Martha Coakley 310,227 47
"Democratic Mike Capuano 184,791 28
"Democratic Alan Khazei 88,929 13
"Democratic Stephen Pagliuca 80,248 12
Total votes 664,195 100
Massachusetts Republican primary election[108]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Scott Brown 145,465 89
"Republican Jack Robinson 17,241 11
Total votes 162,706 100
2010 Massachusetts U.S. Senate special election
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Scott Brown 1,168,178 51.83 n/a
"Democratic Martha Coakley 1,060,861 47.07 n/a
Liberty Joseph L. Kennedy 22,388 0.99 n/a
All others 1,155 0.05 n/a
Blanks 1,145 0.05 n/a
Total votes 2,253,727 100
"Turnout 54
"Republican gain from "Democratic "Swing Increase 21.3

Missouri[edit]

Missouri election
"Missouri
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Roy Blunt, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""SOS Robin Carnahan.jpg
Nominee "Roy Blunt "Robin Carnahan
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,054,160 789,736
Percentage 54.2% 40.6%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Kit Bond
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Roy Blunt
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Kit Bond retired instead of seeking a fifth term. Republican nominee "Roy Blunt won the open seat.[109]

Republican primary election[110]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Roy Blunt 411,040 70.9%
"Republican Chuck Purgason 75,663 13.1%
"Republican Kristi Nichols 40,744 7.0%
"Republican Deborah Solomon 15,099 2.6%
"Republican Hector Maldonado 8,731 1.5%
"Republican Davis Conway 8,525 1.5%
"Republican R.L. Praprotnik 8,047 1.4%
"Republican Tony Laszacs 6,309 1.1%
"Republican Mike Vontz 5,190 0.9%
Total votes 579,348 100.00%
Democratic primary election[110]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Robin Carnahan 266,349 83.9%
"Democratic Richard Charles Tolbert 33,731 10.6%
"Democratic Francis Vangeli 17,511 5.5%
Total votes 317,591 100.00%

Democrat "Robin Carnahan and national Democrats heavily criticized Blunt for his support of bailouts, calling him "Bailout Blunt."[111] Blunt criticized her for supporting President Obama's "stimulus package, the "cap-and-trade energy bill, and the "health care reform bill.[112]

United States Senate election in Missouri, 2010[113]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Roy Blunt 1,054,160 54.23% -1.86%
"Democratic Robin Carnahan 789,736 40.63% -2.17%
"Libertarian Jonathan Dine 58,663 3.02% +2.29%
"Constitution Jerry Beck 41,309 2.13% +1.74%
Majority 264,424 13.60%
Total votes 1,943,868 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Nevada[edit]

Nevada election
"Nevada
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Harry Reid official portrait 2009 crop.jpg ""Sharron Angle.jpg
Nominee "Harry Reid "Sharron Angle
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 362,785 321,361
Percentage 50.2% 44.5%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Harry Reid
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Harry Reid
"Democratic

Incumbent Democratic "Majority Leader "Harry Reid won re-election to a fifth term.[114]

Democratic primary Tuesday, June 8, 2010[115]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Harry Reid (Incumbent) 87,401 75.3%
"Democratic None of these 12,341 10.6%
"Democratic Alex Miller 9,717 8.4%
"Democratic Eduardo Hamilton 4,645 4.0%
"Democratic Carlo Poliak 1,938 1.7%
Total votes 116,042 100.00%
Republican primary Tuesday, June 8, 2010[115]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Sharron Angle 70,452 40.1%
"Republican Sue Lowden 45,890 26.1%
"Republican Danny Tarkanian 40,936 23.3%
"Republican John Chachas 6,926 3.9%
"Republican Chad Christensen 4,806 2.7%
"Republican None of these 3,091 1.8%
"Republican Bill Parson 1,484 0.8%
"Republican Gary Bernstein 698 0.4%
"Republican Garn Mabey 462 0.3%
"Republican Cecilia Stern 355 0.2%
"Republican Brian Nadell 235 0.1%
"Republican Terry Suominen 224 0.1%
"Republican Gary Marinch 179 0.1%
Total votes 175,738 100.00%

Reid was initially considered vulnerable, with the non-partisan "Cook Political Report rating the election as a tossup[116] and the "Rothenberg Political Report rating the state as tossup.[117] A June 9, 2010, "Rasmussen Reports post-primary poll showed Angle leading incumbent Senator Harry Reid by a margin of 50% to 39%.[118] However, a July 2010 poll showed Senator Reid leading Angle by 7 points, following nationwide attention to some of Angle's positions,[119] as well as the endorsement of Reid by prominent Republicans. The change of margin, 18% in less than a month, is the largest in Senate elections history.[119] On July 28, 2010, "Rasmussen Reports moved the race from tossup to leans Democratic.[120] Later, it moved back to tossup. Despite Angle leading by three points in the polls the days leading up to the election, Reid defeated her by 5.74%, even in her own county, "Washoe County. Reid also secured huge numbers out of the Democratic stronghold of "Clark County, which covers the Las Vegas Metropolitan Area.

United States Senate election in Nevada, 2010[121][122][123]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Harry Reid (Incumbent) 362,785 50.29% -10.84%
"Republican Sharron Angle 321,361 44.55% +9.45%
None of These Candidates 16,174 2.25% +0.65%
Tea Party Scott Ashjian 5,811 0.81% N/A
"Independent Michael L. Haines 4,261 0.59% N/A
style="background-color: Template:Independent American Party (United States)/meta/color; width: 5px;" | [[Independent American Party (United States)|Template:Independent American Party (United States)/meta/shortname]] Timothy Fasano 3,185 0.44% N/A
"Independent Jesse Holland 3,175 0.44% N/A
"Independent Jeffery C. Reeves 2,510 0.35% N/A
"Independent Wil Stand 2,119 0.29% N/A
Majority 41,424 5.74%
Total votes 721,381 100.00% -11.14%
"Democratic hold "Swing

New Hampshire[edit]

New Hampshire election
"New Hampshire
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Kelly Ayotte, Official Portrait, 112th Congress 1.jpg ""Congressman Paul Hodes.JPG
Nominee "Kelly Ayotte "Paul Hodes
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 272,703 166,538
Percentage 60.2% 36.7%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Judd Gregg
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Kelly Ayotte
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Judd Gregg retired instead of seeking a fourth term. Republican nominee "Kelly Ayotte won the open seat by over 23 points, after winning a close party primary. New Hampshire trended Democratic in the 2006 and 2008 elections, with Republican incumbents losing both of the state's "House seats and its other "Senate seat to Democrats, but polling conducted in late December 2008 showed Gregg defeating both of the state's U.S. Representatives in a hypothetical match-up.

Republican primary election[124]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Kelly Ayotte 53,056 38.21%
"Republican Ovide Lamontagne 51,397 37.01%
"Republican Bill Binnie 19,508 14.05%
"Republican Jim Bender 12,611 9.08%
"Republican Dennis Lamare 1,388 1.00%
"Republican Tom Alciere 499 0.36%
"Republican Gerard Beloin 402 0.29%
Total votes 138,861 100.00%

Democrat "Paul Hodes called himself a fiscal conservative, which was mocked by Republican "Kelly Ayotte in a TV ad. Hodes was criticized for supporting President Obama's "Economic Recovery package, a "carbon energy tax, and "Affordable Care Act.[125][126][127] Hodes criticized Ayotte for numerous controversies. One ad was questioned Ayotte's honesty in dealing with the Lakes Region Ponzi scheme which defrauded investors of almost $80 million.[128]

New Hampshire general election[129]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Kelly Ayotte 272,703 60.16% -6.08%
"Democratic Paul Hodes 166,538 36.74% +2.99%
"Independent Chris Booth 9,285 2.05% N/A
"Libertarian Ken Blevens 4,754 1.05% +1.03%
Majority 106,165 23.42%
Total votes 453,280 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

New York[edit]

New York election
"New York (state)
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Charles Schumer official portrait.jpg ""No image.svg
Nominee "Chuck Schumer Jay Townsend
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 3,047,775 1,480,337
Percentage 66.4% 33.0%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Chuck Schumer
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Chuck Schumer
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Chuck Schumer won re-election to a third term.[130]

In addition to this regular election, there was also a "special election to fill the Senate seat vacated by "Hillary Clinton, who became the "United States Secretary of State on January 21, 2009. That race, along with the "New York gubernatorial election, one with a vulnerable Democratic incumbent and the other an open race, respectively,[131] was believed to lead major New York Republicans to gravitate towards them rather than challenge the popular Schumer.[132][133] As it happened, however, the Republican Party had difficulty in drawing top-tier candidates to any of the three races.

Republican primary election[134]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Jay Townsend 234,440 55.41%
"Republican Gary Berntsen 188,628 44.59%
Total votes 423,068 100.00%
New York general election[135][136]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Chuck Schumer (Incumbent) 2,686,043 56.27%
"Working Families Chuck Schumer (Incumbent) 183,672 3.85%
"Independence Chuck Schumer (Incumbent) 177,396 3.72%
Total "Chuck Schumer (Incumbent) 3,047,111 63.84%
"Republican Jay Townsend 1,238,947 25.96%
"Conservative (N.Y.) Jay Townsend 240,777 5.04%
Total Jay Townsend 1,479,724 31.00%
"Green Colia Clark 42,340 0.89%
"Libertarian Randy Credico 24,863 0.52%
None Blank/Void/Scattering 179,373 3.76%
Total votes 4,773,411 100.0%
"Democratic hold "Swing

New York (Special)[edit]

New York special election
"New York (state)
← "2006
"2012 →
  ""Senator Kirsten Gillibrand.jpg ""Joseph DioGuardi.jpg
Nominee "Kirsten Gillibrand "Joseph DioGuardi
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 2,837,589 1,582,603
Percentage 62.95% 35.11%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Kirsten Gillibrand
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Kirsten Gillibrand[137]
"Democratic

"Governor "David Paterson had appointed Democrat "Kirsten Gillibrand to serve as United States Senator this "special election, replacing former Senator "Hillary Clinton, who resigned to serve as "U.S. Secretary of State in the "Barack Obama administration. The winner of the special election would complete the term ending in January 2013. Due to this special election, this was the first time since the "ratification of the "17th Amendment in 1913 that all of New York's six statewide offices were up for popular election on the same date.

Gillibrand claimed to be an independent thinker and takes a back seat to no one. She also released television advertising touting her experience as from "upstate New York.[138] DioGuardi criticized Gillibrand's recent photos in "Vogue magazine.[139][140]

New York Democratic primary election[141]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Kirsten Gillibrand (Incumbent) 464,512 76.1%
"Democratic Gail Goode 145,491 23.9%
Total votes 610,003 100.00%
New York Republican primary election[141]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Joseph DioGuardi 185,483 41.8%
"Republican David Malpass 167,151 37.7%
"Republican Bruce Blakeman 91,312 20.5%
Total votes 443,946 100.0%
New York general election[142]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Kirsten Gillibrand 2,479,310
"Working Families Kirsten Gillibrand 182,648
"Independence Kirsten Gillibrand 175,631
Total "Kirsten Gillibrand 2,837,589 62.95%
"Republican Joseph DioGuardi 1,338,239
"Conservative (N.Y.) Joseph DioGuardi 244,364
Total "Joseph DioGuardi 1,582,603 35.11%
"Green Cecile A. Lawrence 35,487 0.79%
"Libertarian John Clifton 18,414 0.41%
"Rent Is Too Damn High Joseph Huff 17,018 0.38%
Anti-Prohibition Vivia Morgan 11,785 0.26%
Tax Revolt Bruce Blakeman 4,516 0.10%
Majority 1,254,986
"Turnout 4,507,412
"Democratic hold "Swing

North Carolina[edit]

North Carolina election
"North Carolina
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Richard Burr official portrait crop.jpg ""Elaine Marshall.jpg
Nominee "Richard Burr "Elaine Marshall
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,458,046 1,145,074
Percentage 54.81% 43.05%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Richard Burr
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Richard Burr
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Richard Burr won re-election to a second term. Burr was the first incumbent to win re-election for this seat since "Sam Ervin's last re-election in "1968.[143] Burr's 54.8% also represented the highest vote share a North Carolina Republican received since the state began directly electing its Senators.

This Senate seat was unfavorable to incumbents over the past several decades. No person elected to this seat was re-elected since "Sam Ervin in "1968. His successor, Democrat "Robert Burren Morgan, was defeated for re-election in "1980, along with many other incumbents from his party. His Republican successor, "John Porter East, committed suicide in 1986. East's appointed successor, "Jim Broyhill, served for just four months, resigning upon his November "1986 election loss to former Democratic Governor "Terry Sanford. In "1992, the seat changed hands yet again, as Sanford was defeated by wealthy GOP businessman "Lauch Faircloth, who himself lost in his bid for a second term six years later by "John Edwards. In "2004, no incumbent was defeated, as Edwards was "running for vice president and was not allowed to be on the ballot in both races. However, that year the seat did change parties for the fifth time in a row, with "Richard Burr defeating Bill Clinton's onetime Chief of Staff "Erskine Bowles.

Democratic primary election - May 4, 2010*[144]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Elaine Marshall 154,605 36.4%
"Democratic Cal Cunningham 115,851 27.3%
"Democratic Ken Lewis 72,510 17.1%
"Democratic Marcus W. Williams 35,984 8.5%
"Democratic Susan Harris 29,738 7.0%
"Democratic Ann Worthy 16,655 3.9%
Total votes 425,343 100.0%

* Note: Since no candidate received 40% of the vote on May 4, state law allowed a "runoff (or "second primary") election if requested by the second-place finisher. Cunningham requested such a runoff.[145]

Democratic primary election runoff (June 22, 2010)[144]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Elaine Marshall 95,390 60.0%
"Democratic Cal Cunningham 63,691 40.0%
Total votes 159,081 100.0%
Republican primary election - May 4, 2010[144]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Richard Burr 297,993 80.1%
"Republican Brad Jones 37,616 10.1%
"Republican Eddie Burks 22,111 5.9%
"Republican Larry Linney 14,248 3.8%
Total votes 371,968 100.0%
United States Senate election in North Carolina, 2010[146]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Richard Burr (Incumbent) 1,458,046 54.81% +3.21%
"Democratic Elaine Marshall 1,145,074 43.05% -3.97%
"Libertarian Mike Beitler 55,682 2.09% +0.72%
Majority 312,972 11.76%
Total votes 2,660,079 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

North Dakota[edit]

North Dakota election
"North Dakota
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""John Hoeven, Official Senate Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Tracy Potter - 20100704.jpg
Nominee "John Hoeven "Tracy Potter
Party "Republican "Democratic-NPL
Popular vote 181,689 52,955
Percentage 76.1% 22.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Byron Dorgan
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"John Hoeven
"Republican

Incumbent Democrat "Byron Dorgan did not seek re-election. Republican Governor "John Hoeven won the open seat. Incumbent Byron Dorgan never had a difficult time getting elected, as he obtained 59%, 63%, and 68% in his three senate election bids, respectively. However, in December 2009, "Rasmussen Reports conducted a hypothetical matchup of Governor "John Hoeven against the incumbent. Hoeven led by a large margin, 58% to Dorgan's 36%. It should be noted that 61% of the state still had a favorable view of Dorgan, and if pitted against State Senator "Duane Sand, the incumbent led 52% to 37%.[147]

Hoeven was challenged in the race by North Dakota State Senator "Tracy Potter of "Bismarck. Potter received the endorsement of the "North Dakota Democratic-NPL Party at its state convention on March 27, 2010. Governor Hoeven and Senator Potter advanced to the November 2, 2010 general election following balloting in North Dakota's primary election, which was held June 8, 2010. Neither candidate faced any significant opposition in the primary election.

Democratic-NPL primary election[148]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic-NPL Tracy Potter 26,211 99.6%
"Democratic-NPL Write-ins 95 0.4%
Total votes 26,306 100.0%
Republican primary election[148]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican John Hoeven 64,978 99.8%
"Republican Timothy Beattie 130 0.2%
Total votes 65,108 100.0%
North Dakota general election[149]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican John Hoeven 181,689 76.08% +44.36%
"Democratic-NPL Tracy Potter 52,955 22.17% -46.11%
"Libertarian Keith Hanson 3,890 1.63% N/A
Majority 128,734 53.91%
"Turnout 238,534 100.00%
"Republican gain from "Democratic-NPL "Swing

Ohio[edit]

Ohio election
"Ohio
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Rob Portman, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Lee Fisher.jpg
Nominee "Rob Portman "Lee Fisher
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 2,125,810 1,448,092
Percentage 56.8% 39.4%

"U.S. Senator before election

"George Voinovich
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Rob Portman[150]
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "George Voinovich retired instead of seeking a third term.[151] Republican former "Director of the Office of Management and Budget, "United States Trade Representative, and "Congressman "Rob Portman won the open seat.

Democratic primary election[152]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Lee Irwin Fisher 380,189 55.6%
"Democratic Jennifer Lee Brunner 304,026 44.4%
Total votes 684,206 100.0%
Republican primary election[153]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Rob Portman 667,369 100.00%
Total votes 657,354 100.00%

Originally, the election was seen as a toss up.[154] His experience as a former "Bush official was considered to be a big problem for Portman. Both President "Barack Obama and Vice President "Joe Biden campaigned for Fisher.[155] Television advertisements were very negative. Fisher attacked Portman for helping to ship jobs overseas during his entire political career, backing deals that shipped jobs overseas, and the trade deficit with China, which grew by over $41 billion.[156] Portman claimed in response that most jobs were being lost to other states, not countries.[157] Portman attacked Fisher for supporting Obama's "stimulus and "cap and trade.[158][159]

Winning the election, Portman received the majority of votes in 82 of 88 counties and in 15 of 18 Congressional districts, including the district of liberal U.S. Congressman "Dennis Kucinich.[160]

United States Senate election in Ohio, 2010
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Robert Jones Portman 2,168,742 56.85% -6.61%
"Democratic Lee Irwin Fisher 1,503,297 39.40% +2.85%
"Constitution Eric Deaton 65,856 1.72% N/A
"Independent Michael Pryce 50,101 1.31% N/A
"Socialist Daniel LaBotz 26,454 0.69% N/A
"N/A Arthur Sullivan (write-in) 648 0.02% N/A
Majority 665,445 17.44%
Total votes 3,815,098 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing NA

Oklahoma[edit]

Oklahoma election
"Oklahoma
← "2004
"2014 →
  ""Tom Coburn official portrait 112th Congress.jpg ""No image.svg
Nominee "Tom Coburn "Jim Rogers
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 718,482 265,814
Percentage 70.6% 26.1%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Tom Coburn
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Tom Coburn
"Republican

Incumbent first-term Republican "Tom Coburn won re-election to a second term. Coburn, a very popular incumbent, promised to limit himself to two terms. Despite his popularity, he did release television advertisements. In 2009, Coburn's approval rating in a "PPP poll was 59%, including a 39% approval rating among Democrats.[161] His Democratic opponent is a perennial candidate[162] who did little campaigning.[163]

Democratic primary election[164]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Jim Rogers 157,955 65.4%
"Democratic Mark Myles 83,715 34.6%
Total votes 241,670 100.0%
Republican primary election[164]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Tom Coburn (Incumbent) 223,997 90.4%
"Republican Evelyn Rogers 15,093 6.1%
"Republican Lewis Kelly Spring 8,812 3.5%
Total votes 247,902 100.00%
Oklahoma general election[165]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Tom Coburn (Incumbent) 718,482 70.64% +17.87%
"Democratic Jim Rogers 265,814 26.13% -15.11%
"Independent Stephen Wallace 25,048 2.46% N/A
"Independent Ronald F. Dwyer 7,807 0.77% N/A
Majority 452,668 44.50%
Total votes 1,017,151 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Oregon[edit]

Oregon election
"Oregon
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Ron Wyden official portrait crop.jpg ""Jim Huffman.jpg
Nominee "Ron Wyden "Jim Huffman
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 825,507 566,199
Percentage 57.2% 39.3%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Ron Wyden
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Ron Wyden
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Ron Wyden won re-election to a third full term. Wyden, a popular incumbent with a 52% approval rating in a July poll,[166] touted bipartisanship and promised to hold town-hall meetings annually in each of Oregon's 36 counties and to open offices outside of "Portland and "Salem.[167] A "Survey USA poll taken a few days before the election showed that 23% of Republicans supported Wyden.[168]

Huffman, widely considered as an underdog, financed his own campaign. He defended bonuses for Wall Street executives and questioned "global warming.[169]

Democratic primary election[170]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Ron Wyden 323,652 89.55%
"Democratic Loren Hooker 25,152 6.75%
"Democratic Pavel Goberman 9,985 2.68%
"Democratic Write-ins 3,782 1.02%
Total votes 376,353 100.00%
Republican primary election[170]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Jim Huffman 110,450 41.70
"Republican Loren Later 39,753 15.01
"Republican G. Shane Dinkel 36,760 13.88
"Republican Thomas Stutzman 31,859 12.03
"Republican Keith Waldron 24,602 9.29
"Republican Robin Parker 14,637 5.53
"Republican Walter Woodland 4,417 1.67
"Republican Write-ins 2,213 0.86
Total votes 267,054 100
Oregon general election[171]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Ron Wyden (Incumbent) 825,507 57.22%
"Republican Jim Huffman 566,199 39.25%
"Working Families Bruce Cronk 18,940 1.31%
"Libertarian Marc Delphine 16,028 1.11%
"Progressive Rick Staggenborg 14,466 1.00%
Write-In 1,448 0.10%
Total votes 1,442,588 100.0%
"Democratic hold

Pennsylvania[edit]

Pennsylvania election
"Pennsylvania
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Pat Toomey, Official Portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Rear Admiral Joseph A. Sestak cropped.jpg
Nominee "Pat Toomey "Joe Sestak
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 2,028,945 1,948,716
Percentage 51.0% 49.0%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Arlen Specter
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Pat Toomey
"Republican

Incumbent Republican-turned-Democrat "Arlen Specter ran for re-election to a sixth term,[172] but lost in "the Democratic primary to "Joe Sestak. Republican nominee "Pat Toomey then won the seat.

Democratic primary election[173]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Joe Sestak 568,563 53.9%
"Democratic Arlen Specter (Incumbent) 487,217 46.1%
Total votes 1,055,780 100.00%
Pennsylvania general election[174]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Pat Toomey 2,028,945 51.01% -1.61%
"Democratic Joe Sestak 1,948,716 48.99% +7.00%
Majority 80,229 2.02%
Total votes 3,977,661 100.00%
"Republican gain from "Democratic "Swing

South Carolina[edit]

South Carolina election
"South Carolina
← "2004
"2014 →
  ""Jim DeMint headshot.jpg ""AlvinGreene1.jpg
Nominee "Jim DeMint "Alvin Greene
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 810,771 364,598
Percentage 61.5% 27.7%

 
Nominee "Tom Clements
Party "Green
Popular vote 121,472
Percentage 9.2%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Jim DeMint
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Jim DeMint[175]
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Jim DeMint won re-election to a second term. "Alvin Greene, the Democratic nominee, was the first major-party "African-American U.S. Senate candidate in South Carolina since "Reconstruction. "Alvin Greene's Democratic primary election win and his margin of victory surprised pundits. As of the primary, he had held no public campaign events, raised no money, and did not have a campaign website. A review of the primary election showed that of the state's 46 counties, half had a significant gap between the absentee and primary day ballots. For example, in "Lancaster County, Vic Rawl won the absentees with 84 percent, while Greene won primary day by a double digit margin. Rawl's campaign manager also claimed, "In only two of 88 precincts, do the number of votes Greene got plus the number we got equal the total cast."[176]

Democratic primary election[177]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Alvin Greene 100,362 59.0%
"Democratic Vic Rawl 69,853 41.0%
Total votes 170,215 100.0%
Republican primary election[177]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Jim DeMint (Incumbent) 342,464 83.0%
"Republican Susan McDonald Gaddy 70,194 17.0%
Total votes 412,658 100.0%
United States Senate election in South Carolina, 2010[178]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Jim DeMint (Incumbent) 810,771 61.48% +7.81%
"Democratic Alvin Greene 364,598 27.65% -16.46%
"Green Tom Clements 121,472 9.21% +8.95%
Write-ins 21,953 1.66% +1.58%
Majority 446,173 33.83% +24.33%
Total votes 1,318,794 50.12% -18.88%
"Republican hold "Swing

South Dakota[edit]

South Dakota election
"South Dakota
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""John Thune, official portrait, 111th Congress.jpg
Nominee "John Thune
Party "Republican
Popular vote 227,947
Percentage 100.0%

"U.S. Senator before election

"John Thune
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"John Thune
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "John Thune won re-election to a second term unopposed.[179][180]

Thune was narrowly elected to his first term over Democratic "Senate Minority Leader "Tom Daschle with 51% of the vote in "2004. In spite of his lack of "seniority, Thune rose to the position of chairman of the "Republican Policy Committee in the United States Senate.

No members of the "South Dakota Democratic Party (or any other party) filed to challenge Thune. "Scott Heidepriem, the "South Dakota Senate Minority Leader and a Democratic "candidate for "Governor of South Dakota, said, "We just concluded that John Thune is an extremely popular senator who is going to win another term in the Senate."[181]

Utah[edit]

Utah election
"Utah
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Mike Lee official portrait 112th Congress.jpg ""Sam granato front headshot.jpg
Nominee "Mike Lee Sam Granato
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 390,179 207,685
Percentage 61.6% 32.8%

 
Nominee "Scott Bradley
Party "Constitution
Popular vote 35,937
Percentage 5.7%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Bob Bennett
"Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

"Mike Lee
"Republican

Incumbent Republican "Bob Bennett was seeking re-election to a fourth term, but was eliminated in the GOP state convention. Republican "Mike Lee, who won the Republican primary, won the open seat.

At the Republican convention, incumbent Senator Bob Bennett finished third in balloting among delegates and was eliminated from the race. Business owner Tim Bridgewater finished first and attorney Mike Lee finished second, but Bridgewater did not receive enough votes to avoid a primary election runoff against Lee.[182] At the Democratic convention, delegates nominated businessman Sam Granato, who received 77.5 percent of the vote.[183]

Republican primary election results[184]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Mike Lee 98,512 51.2%
"Republican Tim Bridgewater 93,905 48.8%
Total votes 192,417 100.0%
Democratic convention
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Sam Granato 77 77.5%
"Democratic Christopher Stout 23 22.5%
Total votes 100 100.0%
Utah general election[185]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican "Mike Lee 390,179 61.56% -7.18%
"Democratic Sam Granato 207,685 32.77% +4.37%
"Constitution "Scott Bradley 35,937 5.67% +3.78%
Majority 182,494 28.79%
Total votes 633,801 100.00%
"Republican hold "Swing

Vermont[edit]

Vermont election
"Vermont
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Patrick Leahy 113th Congress.jpg ""No image.svg
Nominee "Patrick Leahy Len Britton
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 151,281 72,699
Percentage 64.36% 30.93%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Patrick Leahy
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Patrick Leahy[186]
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Patrick Leahy easily won re-election to a seventh term.

Democratic primary election[187]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic "Patrick Leahy (Incumbent) 64,177 89.06%
"Democratic Daniel Frielich 7,886 10.94%
Total votes 72,063 100.0%
United States Senate election in Vermont, 2010[188]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic "Patrick Leahy (Incumbent) 151,281 64.36% -6.27%
"Republican Len Britton 72,699 30.93% +6.38%
"Independent Daniel Freilich 3,544 1.51% N/A
"Marijuana Cris Ericson 2,731 1.16% N/A
"Independent Stephen Cain 2,356 1.00% N/A
"Socialist "Peter Diamondstone 1,433 0.61% N/A
"Independent Johenry Nunes 1,021 0.43% N/A
Majority 78,528 33.43%
Total votes 235,065 100.00%
"Democratic hold "Swing

Washington[edit]

Washington election
"Washington (state)
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Patty Murray, official portrait, 113th Congress.jpg ""Dino Rossi Official.jpg
Nominee "Patty Murray "Dino Rossi
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 1,314,930 1,196,164
Percentage 52.4% 47.6%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Patty Murray
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Patty Murray
"Democratic

Incumbent Democrat "Patty Murray won re-election to a fourth term.

Republican Dino Rossi heavily criticized Murray for her support of the "2009 economic stimulus package; however, Rossi's economic promises are nearly identical to those of President Bush who asked for the stimulus.[189] Rossi supports repealing the "Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the "Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. He also criticized Murray for her support for "earmarks. In response, Murray said, "You bet that seniority and leadership has a big thing to do with it, but the other part of it is, I get up every day and I work hard and I believe in this and I am going to continue fighting for the community I represent."[190]

Washington "Blanket primary election[191]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Patty Murray (Incumbent) 670,284 46.22%
"Republican Dino Rossi 483,305 33.33%
"Republican Clint Didier 185,034 12.76%
"Republican Paul Akers 37,231 2.57%
"Independent Skip Mercer 12,122 0.84%
"Democratic Charles Allen 11,525 0.79%
"Democratic Bob Burr 11,344 0.78%
"Republican Norma Gruber 9,162 0.63%
"Republican Michael Latimer 6,545 0.45%
"Democratic Mike the Mover 6,019 0.42%
"Democratic Goodspaceguy 4,718 0.33%
"Reform William Baker 4,593 0.32%
"Independent Mohammad Said 3,387 0.23%
"Independent Schalk Leonard 2,818 0.19%
"Republican William Chovil 2,039 0.14%
Total votes 1,450,126 100.00%
Washington General election
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Patty Murray (Incumbent) 1,314,930 52.36%
"Republican Dino Rossi 1,196,164 47.64%
Total votes 2,511,094 100.00%
"Turnout 71.24

West Virginia (Special)[edit]

West Virginia special election
"West Virginia
← "2006
"2012 →
  ""Joe Manchin official portrait 112th Congress.jpg ""John Raese.jpg
Nominee "Joe Manchin "John Raese
Party "Democratic "Republican
Popular vote 283,358 230,013
Percentage 53.5% 43.4%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Carte Goodwin
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Joe Manchin
"Democratic

Long-time Democratic Senator "Robert Byrd died June 28, 2010 and Democratic Governor "Joe Manchin appointed "Carte Goodwin to temporarily fill the vacancy. Goodwin pledged to not run for election to the seat in exchange for the appointment. Manchin won the open seat and served out the remainder of Byrd's elected term, which ended on January 3, 2013.[192]

During the Republican primary campaign, only Raese and Warner released television advertisements.[193]

West Virginia Democratic primary election[194]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Democratic Joe Manchin 67,498 72.9
"Democratic Ken Hechler 16,039 17.3
"Democratic Sheirl Fletcher 9,035 9.8
Total votes 92,572 100
West Virginia Republican primary election[194]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican John Raese 38,152 71.4
"Republican Mac Warner 7,892 14.8
"Republican Scott H. Williams 1,530 2.9
"Republican Kenneth Culp 1,364 2.6
"Republican Harry C. Bruner Jr. 1,283 2.4
"Republican Thomas Ressler 1,184 2.2
"Republican Lynette Kennedy McQuain 907 1.7
"Republican Frank Kubic 462 0.9
"Republican Daniel Scott Rebich 450 0.8
"Republican Albert Howard 176 0.3
Total votes 53,400 100
United States Senate special election in West Virginia, 2010 results[195]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Democratic Joe Manchin 283,358 53.47% -10.96%
"Republican John Raese 230,013 43.40% +9.69%
"Mountain Jesse Johnson 10,152 1.92% +0.06%
"Constitution Jeff Becker 6,425 1.21% N/A
Majority 53,345 10.07%
Total votes 529,948 100
"Democratic hold "Swing

Wisconsin[edit]

Wisconsin election
"Wisconsin
← "2004
"2016 →
  ""Ron Johnson, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg ""Russ Feingold Official Portrait 3.jpg
Nominee "Ron Johnson "Russ Feingold
Party "Republican "Democratic
Popular vote 1,125,932 1,020,841
Percentage 51.86% 47.02%

"U.S. Senator before election

"Russ Feingold
"Democratic

Elected U.S. Senator

"Ron Johnson
"Republican

Incumbent Democrat "Russ Feingold ran for re-election to a fourth term, but was defeated by political newcomer, Republican "Ron Johnson. Johnson, a millionaire manufacturer and "Tea Party movement favorite who was running for his first political office, was the front runner. In response to controversy over his ownership of stock in "British Petroleum (BP), Johnson said he would sell it when market conditions were favorable and possibly use the proceeds to help finance his Senate campaign. Feingold's first television ad was a positive ad released in March. In July 2010, Feingold's second 2010 television election ad attacked Johnson for alleged support for "offshore drilling in the "Great Lakes. Johnson quickly countered Feingold with a television ad of his own. Feingold's logo was Moving Forward. In one ad he emphasized independence and called himself a ""Penny Pincher."[196] Johnson argued that his professions, "manufacturer and "accountant were underrepresented in the U.S. Senate, and there were too many lawyers (57 out of 100 members), including Feingold.[197]

Wisconsin Republican primary election[198]
Party Candidate Votes %
"Republican Ron Johnson 500,821 84.7%
"Republican David Westlake 61,287 10.4%
"Republican Stephen M. Finn 29,002 4.9%
Total votes 591,107 100.0%
Wisconsin general election[199]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
"Republican Ron Johnson 1,125,999 51.86% +7.75%
"Democratic Russ Feingold (Incumbent) 1,020,958 47.02% -8.33%
"Constitution Rob Taylor 23,473 1.08% N/A
Write-In Votes 901 0.04% N/A
Majority 105,041 4.84% -6.4%
"Turnout 2,170,430 100.00% -26.4%
"Republican gain from "Democratic

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although "Joe Lieberman (CT) was elected in 2006 as "Connecticut for Lieberman," most sources, including him, refer to him as an "Independent Democrat," and he is included here as an "Independent."
  2. ^ Both Independents caucused with the "Democrats.

References[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

Voss, D. Stephen & Gross, Donald (2011). "Chapter 8: Poster Child for the Tea Party: Rand Paul of Kentucky". In Miller, William J. & Walling, Jeremy D. Tea Party Effects on 2010 Senate Elections. Lexington Books. pp. 141–172. "ISBN "978-0739167014. 

External links[edit]

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